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Showing most liked content since 11/17/2017 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    I disagree. From my experience, general-purpose content management systems often fail to meet requirements and often get in the way when trying to code a solution. Their main purpose is to provide a way to make website to those without coding skills.
  2. 1 point
    I don't think your question is worded correctly, $_POST is available on every request but your browser will only send one request at a time. Meaning you can only submit one form at a time. Anything that you want to be submitted all needs to be in the form. Of course, you can use Javascript to add or remove form elements if you want to build an interface like that. But each request to the server is only 1 request, you don't send multiple requests at the same time other than if you're using ajax to send a bunch of requests, but even so that's not the best idea. If you find yourself sending multiple requests in a short period you probably need a more efficient design, requests have overhead. If you're just asking how you can structure a page with multiple forms where you can figure out which form was submitted, there's a post about that here: http://w3schools.invisionzone.com/topic/12509-php-tips-and-tutorials/ I would assume that the trigger would update the timestamp, but the final word there is to just test it.
  3. 1 point
    Use ALTER, its described here https://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/62051/alter-table-rename-a-column
  4. 1 point
    It just sets a variable to another value. That value comes from $_GET, which holds all of the values that were included in the URL.
  5. 1 point
    I misread what you wrote, I thought you wrote "there is no such thing as scope". Yes, SQL queries have a scope.
  6. 1 point
    Yes, you need the same number and type of columns returned. You don't need to use the same table aliases necessarily, but it makes sense to use the same column names. That's not a correct assumption, if you remove the table aliases but keep them in the list of columns you'll get an error indicating that it doesn't know what p or c is. In that specific example, I don't think so, I think those aliases only apply to the select query where they are used. I could be wrong about that though, you might be able to use one in the other select query, but I don't think that would work. Yes. It won't, it's just being explicit about what you're asking for. If you wanted each ID from the two tables separately, for example, you should give each one a unique alias instead of returning 2 columns with the same name. If you change the data type of a column and there is existing data, MySQL will attempt to convert the data to the new data type. There are various rules for converting data between types. This is also called casting. You can also explicitly convert data during a SQL query, there are functions to do that. Those are the same functions that MySQL would use if you change the data type of a column.
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