kaijim

XHTML Tutorial and Reference

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That was not sufficient tutorial so you are requested that you should add more information so that it is sensible for any webdeveloper.RegardsRoberto XananaRX

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Im with RX.. The tutorial is really a quick start but xhtml2.0 stuff is missed in it. Yesterday i was reading one article on web and surprised to find 5 xhtml dtds exist instead of 3 as given in w3schools tutorial. Later learnt xhtml 2.0 things r not mentioned in this tutorial..That wud be a great help if u could include xhtm2 details in it.thanksvnay.v_nai@yahoo.com

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If you did just a little more researching, you would know that XHTML 2.0 is still a working draft. It is too early for anyone to teach it, scince all of the stuff is still not clear.Currently there are only 4 DTDs. The three W3Schools mentions and XHTML1.1's which was mentioned in another W3Schools tutorial.There are also two HTML DTDs (Scrict and Loose) and that's probably the thing W3Schools missed, but then again, who cares? You should use XHTML 1.0 anyway.By the way, older versions of HTML have DTDs too, but they were only used for validation as is the case with HTML4. However, the XHTML DTD also make the CSS behave as closely as possible to the CSS-on-XHTML spec. That is why W3Schools says you really need the DTD in order for XHTML to work.There is stuff they've missed, but nothing so critical for you not knowing the language.

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There are also two HTML DTDs (Scrict and Loose) and that's probably the thing W3Schools missed, but then again, who cares? You should use XHTML 1.0 anyway.
Why is that? If I'm going to make a website, using the SGML for structure and CSS for presentation, what's my motivation for using XHTML 1.0 over HTML 4.01? What benefits does it have, considering today's browser market? I realize that it conforms to XML, but big deal. Why is that a benefit? If I'm still going to use CSS and not worry about things like XSLT, then why should I bother? If XML somehow makes it more accessible, are there any devices or products on the market today that actually take advantage of that, and display XHTML pages better then they do a well-formed and validating HTML 4.01 page?I mean apart from the fact that it is a newer spec, and considering the fact that webservers will not be sending the correct mime type for several years at least, is there any real motivation to use it?

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Yes. Any language that can deal with XML documents can deal with XHTML document as if it's an XML document. So let's say you want to grab all links' URLs. With a complex and rather weird regular expression you would achieve that, but there may always be some sort of leak. If the XML parser was used, an XPath expression like

//a/href

would serve perfectly and flawlessly for that job. But if the document is not a well formed XML document, this wouldn't work.

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By the way, there's a list of valid DTDs if anyone is interested :).

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I know how to write HTML, by the ways I try to read W3schools' tutorial about XHTML but i do not understand. :)

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XHTML is really just HTML made to follow the rules of XML, things like closing empty tags with /> (e.g. <br /> instead of <br>), and compulsory attributes (e.g. alt on <img /> tags).

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I know how to write HTML, by the ways I try to read W3schools' tutorial about XHTML but i do not understand. :)
it's pretty much spelled out right at the beginning...XHTML elements must be properly nested (matching opening/closing tag's, and closing a tag within a tag first...)XHTML elements must always be closed (all tags must have '/' before they close)XHTML elements must be in lowercase (simple enough)XHTML documents must have one root element (must be withing a <html></html>)pretty strightforward for the most part, I think. The rest is listed thought the tut. Anyway, code an HTML page with an XHTML DTD and see what the valaditor spits back out at you.also,Attribute names must be in lower case Attribute values must be quoted Attribute minimization is forbidden The id attribute replaces the name attribute The XHTML DTD defines mandatory elements

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Two years late... :)

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The W3Schools pages say that the HTML <p> </p> set of tags give a line feed plus an empty line between paragraphs. I've tried on Firefox and IE and both of these act exactly the same for these tags as for a <br /> tag. Is there a difference?

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<br /> Doesn't add an empty line, it just takes you to the next line.

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The actual difference between <p></p> and <br> is that <p> indicates that the text is a paragraph while <br> tells the browser to put a line break there.

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Then there is no real difference between their actions ? Neither of them gives a blank line (I think they used to before HTML5).

Edited by PhilOfPerth

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The actual difference between <p></p> and <br> is that <p> indicates that the text is a paragraph while <br> tells the browser to put a line break there.
Ah, now I see it... the break is an "empty tag" which just does its thing, no ifs or buts, and you can't do much else with it, whereas a paragraph can be styled to do all sorts of things.(but the question remains, does paragraph, by default, leave a blank line, as W3Schools states? It doesn't on my machine).

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does paragraph, by default, leave a blank line, as W3Schools states? It doesn't on my machine
I think its default behaviour is adding a blank line. It works like that for me.

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I know how to write HTML, by the ways I try to read W3schools' tutorial about X HTML but i do not understand. :(
Well, X HTML stands for Extended HTML or Extensive Hyper Text Mark up language, which means it is an extended version of HTML just to create a common environment for the essence of building up websites "HTML infrastructure" and create a common soil for all browsers by validating X HTML through the World Wide Web Consortium ValidatorThank you:)

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I know how to write HTML, by the ways I try to read W3schools' tutorial about XHTML but i do not understand. :(

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It is very easy to read the theory part and write the HTML codes too.

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I have visited several W3Schools it's very helpful for web designer. Thanks for share this link.. @kaijim

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Hi everybody! Please explain if the new tags, atributes etc. introduced in HTML5 are also usable in XHTML1.0? And if not, which one currantly gives more advantages, HTML5 or XHTML1.0?

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