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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/26/2013 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    There's nothing formal to tell you things like that. People do it themselves, and it tends to illustrate the Dunning-Kruger effect. People who just recently started tend to rate themselves highly, and only when you get more into something do you realize how much you don't know. I wouldn't put any weight on things like that. If you want to evaluate someone's capabilities look for a portfolio or things they've actually finished.
  2. 2 points
    You had wrongly referenced a JavaScript function, and wrongly named a css selector so very important position: relative was not applied. <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"> <style> * {box-sizing:border-box} body {font-family: Verdana,sans-serif;margin:0} .mySlides {display:none; width: 100%;} /* Slideshow container */ .slideshow { /*NOT slideshow-container*/ max-width: 1000px; position: relative; margin: auto; } /* Next & previous buttons */ .prev, .next { cursor: pointer; position: absolute; top: 50%; width: auto; padding: 16px; margin-top: -22px; color: white; font-weight: bold; font-size: 18px; transition: 0.6s ease; border-radius: 0 3px 3px 0; } /* Position the "next button" to the right */ .next { right: 0; border-radius: 3px 0 0 3px; } /* On hover, add a black background color with a little bit see-through */ .prev:hover, .next:hover { background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0.8); } /* Caption text */ .text { color: #f2f2f2; font-size: 15px; padding: 8px 12px; position: absolute; bottom: 8px; width: 100%; text-align: center; } /* Number text (1/3 etc) */ .numbertext { color: #f2f2f2; font-size: 12px; padding: 8px 12px; position: absolute; top: 0; } /* The dots/bullets/indicators */ .dot { cursor:pointer; height: 13px; width: 13px; margin: 0 2px; background-color: #bbb; border-radius: 50%; display: inline-block; transition: background-color 0.6s ease; } .active, .dot:hover { background-color: #f44336; } /* Fading animation */ .fade { -webkit-animation-name: fade; -webkit-animation-duration: 1.5s; animation-name: fade; animation-duration: 1.5s; } @-webkit-keyframes fade { from {opacity: .4} to {opacity: 1} } @keyframes fade { from {opacity: .4} to {opacity: 1} } /* On smaller screens, decrease text size */ @media only screen and (max-width: 300px) { .prev, .next,.text {font-size: 11px} } </style> </head> <body> <div id="wrapper"> <div class="slideshow w3-container w3-half"> <div class="w3-content w3-display-container"> <img class="mySlides fade" src="https://www.w3schools.com/howto/img_nature_wide.jpg"> <img class="mySlides fade" src="https://www.w3schools.com/howto/img_fjords_wide.jpg"> <a class="prev" onclick="plusDivs(-1, 0)">&#10094;</a> <a class="next" onclick="plusDivs(1, 0)">&#10095;</a> <!-- Extra plusDivs parameter refers to first (0) slideshow (start from 0) --> </div> <br> <div style="text-align:center"> <span class="dot" onclick="currentDiv(1, 0)"></span> <span class="dot" onclick="currentDiv(2, 0)"></span> </div> </div> <hr> <div class="slideshow w3-container w3-half"> <div class="w3-content w3-display-container"> <img class="mySlides fade" src="https://www.w3schools.com/howto/img_nature_wide.jpg"> <img class="mySlides fade" src="https://www.w3schools.com/howto/img_fjords_wide.jpg"> <a class="prev" onclick="plusDivs(-1, 1)">&#10094;</a> <a class="next" onclick="plusDivs(1, 1)">&#10095;</a> <!-- Extra plusDivs parameter refers to second (1) slideshow (start from 0) --> </div> <br> <div style="text-align:center"> <span class="dot" onclick="currentDiv(1, 1)"></span> <span class="dot" onclick="currentDiv(2, 1)"></span> </div> </div> <script> var slideIndex = 1; var z = document.getElementsByClassName("slideshow"); for (i = 0; i < z.length; i++) { //set custom data attribute to first current image index z[i].setAttribute("data-currentslide", 1); showDivs(z[i].getAttribute("data-currentslide"), i); } function plusDivs(n, j) { //get custom data attribute value of current image index to slideshow class index j slideIndex = parseInt(z[j].getAttribute("data-currentslide")[0]); showDivs(slideIndex += n, j); } function currentDiv(n, j) { showDivs(slideIndex = n, j); /* showDivs Not showSlides*/ } function showDivs(n, j) { var i; var z = document.getElementsByClassName("slideshow")[j]; var x = z.getElementsByClassName("mySlides"); var dots = z.getElementsByClassName("dot"); if (n > x.length) { slideIndex = 1 } if (n < 1) { slideIndex = x.length; } //set custom data attribute to current image index z.setAttribute("data-currentslide", slideIndex); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } for (i = 0; i < dots.length; i++) { dots[i].className = dots[i].className.replace(" active", ""); } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; dots[slideIndex - 1].className += " active"; } </script> </div> </body> </html>
  3. 2 points
    I don't know where there's a list. Generally you should never develop for specific devices, you should just make your layout flexible enough (with help of media queries) to wotk on any screen regardless of size. This is usually achieved by testing your page in the responsive mode of your browser and resizing the viewport until it breaks, then you add a media query to correct the layout. But for reference, I start off with a design for the following devices, then make extra adjustments later: Small mobile (iPhone 4):Up to 374px (I usually use this just for specific elements that didn't fit) Mobile or small mobile in landscape): Up to 767px Tablet portrait: 768px Tablet landscape: 1024px (breakpoint usually between 800px and 900px) Desktop: 1025px and above Some people make designs for large desktop computers (1440px and above), but that's up to you. In general, there isn't one specific strategy for responsive design, this is just the approach from the companies I work with.
  4. 2 points
    Like astralaaron said using closest class and the index class in jquery you can get the index of the tr, have a look at the fiddle. https://jsfiddle.net/8hL46ftj/ hope this helps $('img').click(function(){ alert($(this).closest('tr').index()) })
  5. 1 point
    It looks like you're missing the FROM keyword here: SELECT * parent_table
  6. 1 point
    I always use a single numeric ID as the primary key unless I have a really good reason to do anything else, like if it is only a lookup table with 2 columns and then I make both columns primary. The ID is used internally by the database only and would never need to be changed, I do not use it as an identifier that anyone else would need to know. If you want to give your podcasts a number for people to identify them, make that another database field other than the ID. If you want a revision number, make that another database field. That way the ID will refer to a specific episode and revision. For as long as I've been doing this I haven't found a great use case for not just using an auto-increment primary key. No, it's one of storage. A char field always stores the maximum number of characters that the field allows. A varchar only stores what is necessary but has a maximum length. See here for storage requirements. Note also that an int field always uses 4 bytes regardless of the length you gave it. If a number has a smaller range than use one of the smaller int types. I agree, and that is what char fields do, they always store the maximum number of characters. You would only use a char field if the values will always be the same length, like for a GUID. So why not utf8_unicode_ci? Do you want to allow people to have the same username with different capitalization or characters that look the same but are different unicode code points? That's what using utf8_bin would allow, it looks at binary data only and does not take into account case or whether two characters have the same meaning but are different code points. It's just a question about data normalization. Databases have been around for decades, we have this figured out now. If there is a one-to-one relationship, that goes in a single table. If there is a one-to-many relationship, that's a parent and child table. If there is a many-to-many relationship, that's 2 tables with a third lookup table. The database is specifically designed to work with this kind of data, let it do its job. Don't increase the time required to insert, update, or select data because it's less complex for you. Data storage should be optimized for a computer, not a person. You can display it however you want it to show up, but make it easy for the database to do its job. That should be an auto-increment primary key. There's no reason to store a counter like that in a table, you can use SQL to get the count and then it's always going to be correct and you don't have to worry about updating it when things change. The way that's set up now, if you select the rows and order them by ID then it makes the count redundant, you don't need to store that data. I do use columns like that for display order if I want to allow the display order to be specified (as opposed to ordering by date or some other field), where it will be a sequential series, but if you're only storing the count there's no reason to do that.
  7. 1 point
    If it's returning the code then the server is not executing the file. Maybe the web server doesn't support ASP, maybe it's just not configured correctly.
  8. 1 point
    You have PHP session code in a html page? is it setup to run php code in html document?
  9. 1 point
    You misspelled onclick on this line <button onklick="compare()">Check</button>
  10. 1 point
    it will reload the page with querystring '?edit=whatever' then php will read this using $_GET['edit']
  11. 1 point
    You can use Ajax to load data(images, text ....) from a separate file which contains php,asp, txt depending on what you are using once the data is ready to be displayed you can use w3 animation to make it look fancy . Here's the ajax tutorial Ajax.
  12. 1 point
    toGMTString() -> Deprecated. Use the toUTCString() method instead, as stated from here https://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_obj_date.asp
  13. 1 point
    First, IDs need to be unique, it's not correct to have the same ID on more than one element. And option elements don't have a "checked" attribute, checkboxes do. Option elements have a "selected" attribute. To make it easier, you can add a hyphen or something to each name, like "q1-opt1". In PHP you can get each of the values in $_POST (if the only things in $_POST are the select values, then you can just loop through $_POST), you can use explode to split up the name into parts like "q1" and "opt1", check the value they selected, and then you can save which questions they picked yes for.
  14. 1 point
    It is so much much easier to do it in PDO, why don't you use it ? And it is even more secure. dbconnection: try { $username = "db_username"; $password = "db_password"; $db = new PDO("mysql:host=localhost;dbname=your_dbname", $username, $password); $db->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION); echo "Connected !"; } catch (PDOException $e) { echo $e->getMessage(); } then your script to insert those values: try { $sql = "UPDATE users SET Username=:username, Email=:email, EmployeeID=:empid, Designation=:design, Password=:password WHERE Id = :id"; $stmt = $db->prepare($sql); $stmt->bindParam(":username", $username); $stmt->bindParam(":email", $email); $stmt->bindParam(":empid", $employee); $stmt->bindParam(":design", $designation); $stmt->bindParam(":password", $password); $stmt->bindParam(":id", $id); if($stmt->execute()){ echo "<font face='Verdana' size='2' color='green'> You have successfully updated your profile <br /> </font>"; } else { $msg = "<font face='Verdana' size='2' color='red'> There is some problem in updating your profile. Please contact site admin <br /></font>"; } } catch (PDOException $e) { print_r($e->getMessage()); } This is a clean way to do what you want but in PDO not MySQLi.
  15. 1 point
    OK. The advantage of using AJAX is to prevent having to reload the page each time the form is submitted, and the advantage of using PHP is to insure that the submitted data is sanitized and validated. Are implying with this that it is not possible to use Javascript for the purpose of sanitization and validation? If I have understood correctly, AJAX serves only as an intermediary between the form page and the PHP page. In other words, the PHP page should be written, as if the AJAX did not exist, and the AJAX should always refer to the PHP page via the following piece of code $.ajax({ url: 'ajax_comment.php', What is more, the PHP code should only be included in the page, if the following condition is satisfied. !isset( $_SERVER['HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH'] ) Thus, it was wrong for Loois to have included the following code at the bottom of his form page include ("jquery.js"); Under the assumption that all of the above is correct, why is the following code not entered at the top of the form page? include ("jquery.js"); My very best, Roddy
  16. 1 point
    There is no action attribute in the following line of code <form id="form" method="post"> You must enter an URL for ajax_comment.php as the value of your action attribute in the above <form> element. <form id="form" method="post" action='pathto/ajax_comment.php'> Replace the word "pathto" with whatever is necessary to connect the document that contains your form with the document that processes your $_POST variable -- namely, ajax_comment.php.
  17. 1 point
    The RSS file can go anywhere you want, you just have to tell people where to find it. As I mentioned earlier, you can tell browsers where to find a feed by putting a <link> tag in your HTML page. There's no real best practice as to where to place your RSS feed files. I think RSS feeds have to use absolute URLs in the <link> tags including protocol and domain name to point to the location of the files. If you want a URL like "/feed" for your RSS feed you would have to use URL rewriting on the server, a regular URL would look like this instead: "/feed.xml" or "/feed.rss".
  18. 1 point
    If you're using mysqli in PHP then you still need to write the SQL code. mysqli is just an extension for using MySQL, it's not an abstraction layer like you would get with Zend Db or something where you're building PHP method calls instead of writing SQL queries.
  19. 1 point
    You can probably use the manifest to list every file on your site, but that's not going to necessarily make browsing faster, it might just cause the browser to sit there and download everything the first time they visit any page. It's better to have the browser cache everything as it needs it rather than to download your whole site the first time they visit any page.
  20. 1 point
    When you're printing each field you can check if the field ID exists in $non_matches, and style the element appropriately. I'm just suggesting that it is more efficient to print everything correct in the first place, versus printing everything then trying to run client-side code to show errors or whatever else.
  21. 1 point
    function myFunction(elem) { elem.nextElementSibling.classList.toggle("show"); var myDropdown = document.getElementsByClassName("dropdown-content"); for (var i = 0; i < myDropdown.length; i++) { if (myDropdown[i].classList.contains('show')) { if (elem.nextElementSibling !== myDropdown[i]) { myDropdown[i].classList.remove('show'); } } } } BUT! you do realise, the window onclick example (https://www.w3schools.com/howto/tryit.asp?filename=tryhow_css_js_dropdown) does not work in MS Edge, its so good of w3schools to give you an example that does not work in MS Edge and not tell you.
  22. 1 point
    Here's how you created nested elements: /* Create a container */ var container = document.createElement("div"); /* Create children */ var image = document.createElement("img"); //... Set attributes var paragraph = document.createElement("p"); // ... Set attributes and content /* Add children to the container */ container.appendChild(image); container.appendChild(paragraph); /* Add the container to the body */ document.body.appendChild(container);
  23. 1 point
    Use block elements, or turn them into block elements using display: block; or display: inline-block;
  24. 1 point
    header > h1, header > p{ color:red; } /*OR*/ header > h1, header > h1 + p{ color:red; } /*Give header class name */ .colour_version01 {color:red;} <header class="colour_version01"> <h1>Some text</h1> <p>Some more text</p> </header>
  25. 1 point
    BUT! you are still going through multiple id references ('fruit' and img) when only one span and one image only can have the unique id
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