Jump to content
chibineku

Registering Nameserver And Migrating Domain

Recommended Posts

I am trying to set up a complete development suite of Apache, MySQL and PHP on my computer and have a book with all the relevant lessons, but my problem is that I want to migrate a domain (www.sinaesthesia.co.uk) from my existing hosting company (1&1) to my comp. I have contacted 1&1 but they weren't particularly helpful.During the installation of Apache, I was prompted for the domain I wanted to use, and I entered sinaesthesia.co.uk. From here I am not sure where to go. I have the option of changing the default ip attached to sinaesthesia.co.uk to a different one on the 1&1 control panel, but I don't know how independent that makes me of them. I don't want any other involvement from them. Can you name your server and domain anything you like, or...how do you really acquire a domain? Who decided I had to pay for sinaesthesia.co.uk in the first place? Outside the remit of this forum, yes, but I bet someone knows...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Domains are registered with an official domain registrar (for a fee). Domain registrars are themselves accredited by ICANN and their region's internet authority.To make your domain point to your home server, you first have to have a working nameserver on the machine, as well as a static IP address. (You don't actually need a static IP but it can get messy if you don't). Then you just go to the control panel for your domain (on the website of whoever you registered the domain with) and enter the address of your nameserver. If you registered your domain with 1&1 but don't want to keep it with them any more you can transfer it, however unless you want to become a registrar yourself (and long, arduous, expensive and futile process unless you want to become a domain salesperson) you can't gain complete control of the domain name.If you are interested in the process of becoming a registrar ICANN has a nice step-by-step article: http://www.icann.org/en/registrars/accreditation-process.htm.

Edited by Synook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks synook.I have checked the config files for my Apache installation and have found that it has my server name as www.sinaesthesia.co.uk listening on port 80 - which is good, right?So, now I just need to sign in to the 1&1 control panel and change from using their name servers to putting mine in as name server 1. As for the IP address, that is the thing causing me problems at present. 1&1 reports that my IP is not static. What steps are necessary to accomplishing a static IP address? My ISP assigns IP addresses ad hoc - do I need to ask them to make mine static?I also have the option of changing the A-Record to my IP address - does this have the same effect as changing the name server?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have checked the config files for my Apache installation and have found that it has my server name as www.sinaesthesia.co.uk listening on port 80 - which is good, right?
Well yes, but you still have a way to go.
1&1 reports that my IP is not static. What steps are necessary to accomplishing a static IP address? My ISP assigns IP addresses ad hoc - do I need to ask them to make mine static?
Yes, you have to ring up your ISP and ask for a static IP (don't forget to ask them to open port 80 outbound for you, if it isn't already). They'll probably want you to upgrade to a business plan at the same time - they don't like people hosting websites on home plans. :) There are a few ways to get round having dynamic IP addresses, such as by using DynDNS (this also gives you a nameserver). However, you aren't "completely independant" in this manner, as your NS is still externally hosted. :)
So, now I just need to sign in to the 1&1 control panel and change from using their name servers to putting mine in as name server 1.
You need to set up a name server on your computer first before you can point the domain to it. BIND is a very popular name server. After setting it up (and getting it to work) just enter your (now static) IP address in the NS fields of your registrar's control panel and you are good. Edited by Synook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again for the info.My ISP actually directed me to a tutorial that used DynDNS and DynDNS seem sure that it'll be cheaper using them than purchasing a static IP (or swapping to a connection package that offers them).I'll read up on BIND anyway. Ta much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...