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skaterdav85

SSH Keys and Git

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I just started using Git and GitHub today, and during the process I had to set up an SSH Public key through Terminal on my mac and add it to my GitHub account. However, I'm kind of confused on what an SSH key is. Can anyone explain it? After my research, it seems like it is just a more secure way of authenticating users through the command line.Also, does anyone know why GitHub allows me to have more than one SSH Public Key?

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I just started using Git and GitHub today, and during the process I had to set up an SSH Public key through Terminal on my mac and add it to my GitHub account. However, I'm kind of confused on what an SSH key is. Can anyone explain it? After my research, it seems like it is just a more secure way of authenticating users through the command line.Also, does anyone know why GitHub allows me to have more than one SSH Public Key?
Hi and thank you for joining the Version Control conversation - we just added this last week so I hope to get more folks finding their way in here.I can't say I know much about Git - other than it is another (gaining popularity) version control option. So I won't be ablet o help with why the do or do not allow multiple SSH keys.But I can help you under what SSH is. It is sort of backwards from what you would typically think authentication is about. In an SSH configuration, the remote (or client) computer actually does the authentication, not the local(server). So the remote machine has software that the server gets authenticated against. It is a little hard to explain, but that is the basic concept.Here are a couple thinks that might help explain it better:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Shellhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJM0q1W41oE

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Thanks! that video was useful in understanding the basics of SSH and networking protocols.My guess is that GitHub allows users to have more than one SSH key so that I can connect to the same GitHub account from multiple computers.

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Thanks! that video was useful in understanding the basics of SSH and networking protocols.My guess is that GitHub allows users to have more than one SSH key so that I can connect to the same GitHub account from multiple computers.
BINGO:)Because it's client side authentication, you would need multiple keys to gain access from multiple locations.When you have a fairly stable Git process defined, please do share your implementation strategy. I'm hoping to bring a little more attention to this area of discussion since version control plays a huge part in server side scripting.On a side note, I think its interesting to see the first three posters here using three different tools (Subversion, Git, and Collabnet) :)

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Getting stared with Git wasn't too painful. It did take a few hours watching and reading tutorials on NetTuts and setting up my accounts and repositories, but after that it seemed pretty straightforward. You just have to memorize a few commands. I didn't have much experience with the command line except for using 'cd' and 'ls' commands. I chose Git because it was easy to use with GitHub. I was quite intrigued with GitHub (the social network for coders) because it allows me to share my projects with the public and hopefully i'll eventually get feedback and learn from it. GitHub is also really well integrated into the Cloud 9 IDE, which if you havent heard of it, it is a pretty awesome IDE within a browser, so you can edit your projects from any computer.I have also used Subversion at work, but through a GUI like Tortoise or through the NetBeans IDE.

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Interesting. I had hear of Git - I think it is relatively new on the scene. I use Tortoise for my client software but VisualSVN on the server side since I'm using Windows Server 2003. That was a breeze to set up. I looked at GitHub and considered putting my repositories external. I have two public projects I've "released" on riaforge.com where I manage my code on Google Code - so I might move it to GitHub - still undecided.

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