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trinistorm

Another Implementation

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After about roughly 12 hours of trial, error and Google queries I was able to set up and test out a subversion server. I've been using it for about 2 weeks or more and so far so good. I realized its not exactly what I expected and that I most likely am not using it as efficiently as it could be but it has helped me track and manage changes to my code and templates and helps with better organisation.I have a notebook I now do all my development work on so that I am more portable. On this I have a Virtual Machine(headless) with Ubuntu 10.04 Server and I use OpenSSH to interact with it. (I chose a Virtual Server because I wanted to remain portable and I do realize that if my Notebook crashes I'm in for it.)On the virtual server I have subversion configured as part of the http server and I also have an ftp server. I use netbeans as an FTP client and subversion client. The ftp server can only access the htdocs folder and when I save my files, netbeans uploads to the ftp server so that I can run by accessing my network url. The files are also stored in the local projects folder. When I want to check in or "import" to the subversion server, a third copy is made in the "svn" web folder. This setup allows me to checkout my files when I want to work on a particular project (I am working on 3), make my changes and commit them when I'm done. If I end up regretting my changes, I can revert to previous versions, re-create deleted files etc. netbeans also allows you to compare two file versions side by side.The major downside to my setup lies in the fact that I have 3 copies of my code and overall all on the same machine. As I mature a bit more as a developer I intend to setup a dedicated server for this kind of thing and also sign up for some code hosting services such as Git.Well this took me quite some time to understand and setup and Netbeans does all the subversion interactions so aside from a few terminal commands for set up the only subversion command I know of is "import". I downloaded the subversion book but I haven't got the time to read it yet. So far so good though and I'm getting more familiar as time goes on. Any comments, criticism or suggestions? I'm wide open for them. :)

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I actually just started playing around with Git today. Didn't get very far since I was technically on the clock, but I know it's something my boss would be interested in use becoming more familiar with. A couple of weeks ago, a co-worker and I did a presentation on SVN; giving a brief summary of the first few chapters of the SVN red bean book and some examples for setting up a repo locally. Pretty fun. More topics to come, but it was a good review as it was mostly geared towards executing SVN from the command line.I was trying to do Git to commit some of website projects. Will play around with it more tonight.I do like the way you are going with it, but as you've recognized, the greatest flaw is having your personal dev machine double as your repo. If the machine goes down.... :gulp:

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Yeah I know, I'm coding on the edge right now but pretty soon I'll fix that since I got some months until my final year to work on my personal projects. I have a few old machines I used to tinker with so I'm going to make them into virtual server hosts for repo's etc. Also I have a NAS that I back up my virtual machine files, project code etc to.Hope you get more Git time man.

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