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eduard

Critisize my website (www.eduardlid.net)?

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Actually, it's not realy by talking, knowing people, when it comes to web design/development it is 'What you can do'... Just learn & practice. To me, talking/knowing people, is not important... When you are GOOD people will BEG to talk to you & search for the person behind a well designed/developed site.
I read it now carefully! The best reply to this thread!

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You ALL say that my website is out dated (I agree)! But NO-one says what changes are necessary?

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You ALL say that my website is out dated (I agree)! But NO-one says what changes are necessary?
That's weird, maybe we are reading two completely different threads? Oh wait, no you just don't read...
Regardless, if you are expecting people to base your merits on being a web developer based on this website, then I don't really know exactly what you think you are offering them as far as proof of concept. (JS/Jquery, AJAX UI, CSS menu's, PHP/MySQL, any sort of HTML5, etc). As for a web designer, while not every developer is also designer, they know when to have someone at least make the functionality they provide appealing enough to encourage people to actually navigate their site.
So aside from listing some basic proof of concept features, and suggesting you get someone who is good at design to help you, I don't what else there is you want from us? We've told you numerous times in the past things you could show. It's not our job to keep holding your hand, when you've arguably received more help and direction on this forum than any other member I can think of. Edited by thescientist

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Pffffffffffffff-you´re right! I´ve read it, but forgot it (human?)

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we've also told you to write things down. or at least that's what most people do when they want to retain information they are concerned they will forget/want to remember.

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Wait and see (but it always can better!)!

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In the supermarket here they have music which was populair in the 1980´s in Europe!
Music in supermarkets doesn't say anything about a country been advanced or not.

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Now a very difficult question: when is a website finished (it can always better!)

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I think you as an individual developer should be able to determine when your website is finished. When you achieve your goals or your client's goals it should be ready. In my opinion finishing the website is not the hard part. The hard part is making it perfect and that's the part where there is margin for improvement.

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I think you as an individual developer should be able to determine when your website is finished. When you achieve your goals or your client's goals it should be ready. In my opinion finishing the website is not the hard part. The hard part is making it perfect and that's the part where there is margin for improvement.
Thamks!

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You can just say and do anything you want really, and whatever the situation is down in Argentina that you think doesn't exist anywhere else in the world is what it is. Regardless, if you are expecting people to base your merits on being a web developer based on this website, then I don't really know exactly what you think you are offering them as far as proof of concept. (JS/Jquery, AJAX UI, CSS menu's, PHP/MySQL, any sort of HTML5, etc). As for a web designer, while not every developer is also designer, they know when to have someone at least make the functionality they provide appealing enough to encourage people to actually navigate their site. So without form or functionality, sure a prospective client may know the difference at first, but when it comes times to get to task and deliver them a web application, I don't really see the capabilities to deliver much based on what your site offers. You only have one opportunity to make a first impression, I would make sure you are actually ready when that time comes.
What do I´ve to learn now? I know I´ve still to learn a lot in HTML and CSS! But what´s relly new to me as I want to improve my skills as a web designer? I´ll have a look now at the tutorials! CSS3? HTML5? of course! But I´d like something totally different! Edited by eduardchile

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I wouldn't even bother with HTML5/CSS3 until you know what you're doing with just HTML4/CSS2.

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But that I can find out (easily)! My question however was:: ¨something TOTALLY NEW!´

Edited by eduardchile

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But that I can find out (easily)!
Good. now take the time to master it. This is commonly referred to as the learning process. You learn in steps, securing your foundation in one aspect of your desired area of development/skill before moving on to more advanced concepts. Now you may say you aren't a great designer and thus you may argue that it's not your fault that your website doesn't look great, and I would say the same thing about myself. However, if someone came to me with a design and requirements for expected functionality, the difference between us is that I could realize it in well written, semantic, and valid code (HTML/CSS/JS/PHP/etc). That's not the level you are at and so you need to recognize that and build your skills first. Over time, you will hopefully learn a thing or two about design along the way so you can make your own judgement calls. Edited by thescientist
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I think you as an individual developer should be able to determine when your website is finished. When you achieve your goals or your client's goals it should be ready. In my opinion finishing the website is not the hard part. The hard part is making it perfect and that's the part where there is margin for improvement.
Can you say:a website for a client must be finished, your own never will be?

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Typically when you sign on to do work for a client, you define a SOW that specifically outlines the work to be done, and covers the clients expectations of what they are paying you for, balanced with what you are willing to do, in what time, and for how much. Typically there are clauses for any sorts of revisions, extensions, etc which are agreed upon beforehand. Once you fulfill the SOW, then yes, you could say it's finished, but often times you can add provisions for maintenance work or whatnot to do past the point of completion. In software development/programming, projects are never really finished, they just get revised, updated, tweaked, etc. Your own projects can be whatever you want them to be.

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I'm not that good of a web designer myself but here is my 3 cents. The bright blue and bright yellow are a little hard on the eyes. I would recommend lightning up the colors just a little so they are not so shocking/hard to stare at. You have to be carful using load colors. When the web page is downsized all the content gets jumbled up. I would recommend using the HTML Table to fix the layout of the site. That way you can lock in where certain elements appear and they will not get moved around when the window size changes. Well there you go. Hope it helps a little bit.

Edited by FARGORE

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I'm not that good of a web designer myself but here is my 3 cents. The bright blue and bright yellow are a little hard on the eyes. I would recommend lightning up the colors just a little so they are not so shocking/hard to stare at. You have to be carful using load colors. When the web page is downsized all the content gets jumbled up. I would recommend using the HTML Table to fix the layout of the site. That way you can lock in where certain elements appear and they will not get moved around when the window size changes. Well there you go. Hope it helps a little bit.
Thank you very much! Can you be more specific about the HTML table please?

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eduardlid they are saying your website should be looking something like this, even tho this is mostly a static website "contact page is still missing" with the contact page, it will have a sort of php application, so it would be an 80/100 static website. anyway this is the websitewww.divinedesigns1.com www.divinedesigns1.net and this suppose to be a php website with many functions which is requested to have a database, php script and html forms www.divinedesigns1.us

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If you wish to be taken seriously as a designer/developer of websites, then using a html table for your layout is the wrong way to go. Html tables should only be used as intended, to show rows of data in tabular format. You can lock the html content elements as well, without the use of going backward and using tables, which will be treated as a very amateurish method.

Edited by dsonesuk

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If you wish to be taken seriously as a designer/developer of websites, then using a html table for your layout is the wrong way to go. Html tables should only be used as intended, to show rows of data in tabular format. You can lock the html content elements as well, without the use of going backward and using tables, which will be treated as a very amateurish method.
how you lock the html content elements?

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Not really locked as such, but you would restrict it reaching the situation where the elements it would start stacking, by applying for a fluid width site a min-width: for the outer container.

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Not really locked as such, but you would restrict it reaching the situation where the elements it would start stacking, by applying for a fluid width site a min-width: for the outer container.
oh alrite i got it now

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Is it just me? You're obviously attempting to learn web design / development, and your very early on in the learning process. You appear to be struggling with rather basic concepts such as CSS page layout and color schemes etc. I would just suggest that you buy a few books, read through them, take your time. It seems very optimistic that you are going to make a business out of your current understandings as of yet. For example.. if I say to you "I'm a company, I want a site building for me, with a secure login, for my users" Would you be prepared to construct a script from scratch, taking into account security issues such as SQL injection? Information security risks that you may be liable for? Just a thought... :boredom: James

Edited by alvo

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