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number47

HTML, HTML5 "is not supported in HTML5" how to cover both

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Sometimes I see things that are not supported by HTML5 and other times there are things new to only html5.

If I am looking at a method of installing image to a page, and there is no supported by html5 I figure, that is ok because that may be new, and I know somewhere in there "plan ahead for the future" not stick with the old. but I dont know what that matters. I figure if it is a tried and true way of "HTML" than a browser is strolling along, how would the HTML version before html5 be negatively effected. perhaps there could be a link at the html5 warnings where you could click that to see the similar method that is html5. what to do here?

 

 

 

Not sure weather I should care about this yet. until I get the beginning "old fashion" understood better than work with new?

 

 

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I can only imagine that you are talking about obsolete tags such as...

 

http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_center.asp

 

...so yes, stop using those old obsolete tags.

imagin? how so, are you human being? It seemed to convenient when I came across the center tag.

 

so in order to have efficient web site html script and so on and be up to date it seems that validity from the validator can basically leave no room for creativity. does that sound correct? I mean If I decided to use an element that is not typically used in such a way, does that hinder the web site in any way. I have seen some sites that could benefit from some basic editing, also seen some that are laid out "incorrectly" and yet look great and are still navigable and useful.

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Using deprecated elements usually results in code that's harder to maintain.

 

Imagine you're using the <center> tag on 20 pages and tomorrow you want the text to be left-aligned. In CSS, change one rule to "text-align: left". If you want to change the <center> tag you need to go through all 20 pages and remove it.

 

HTML should not be used for presentation.

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...it seems that validity from the validator can basically leave no room for creativity. does that sound correct?

 

No.

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I don't see how not being able to use obsolete tags such as center, or font prevent creativity, as css can be used to achieve the same result and therefore makes the website less bloated, plus more manageable.Basically elements are mostly containers that have there specific styling for there specific purpose, the creativity comes from reproducing a created design layout with styling using css/3, JavaScript/jQuery, images and the way content is presented.

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so in order to have efficient web site html script and so on and be up to date it seems that validity from the validator can basically leave no room for creativity. does that sound correct? I mean If I decided to use an element that is not typically used in such a way, does that hinder the web site in any way. I have seen some sites that could benefit from some basic editing, also seen some that are laid out "incorrectly" and yet look great and are still navigable and useful.

 

That's not the point or the counter argument being made though. Those tags are considered deprecated for a reason, using them locks you into a position of your code breaking unexpectedly whenever a browser vendor finally decides to not support it. As mentioned, in the case of <center>, as mentioned there are much better ways of accomplishing that task.

 

In the case of technology and especially web languages, new features are added all the time, which comes in the forms of either creating a spec, improving an existing one, or removing them (deprecation).

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....Using deprecated elements usually results in code that's harder to maintain.

 

Imagine you're using the <center> tag on 20 pages and tomorrow you want the text to be left-aligned. In CSS, change one rule to "text-align: left". If you want to change the <center> tag you need to go through all 20 pages and remove it.

 

HTML should not be used for presentation.

I underlined the part that gets my interest there and thank you all for replies,

 

" HTML should not be used for presentation" could you maybe,,, just go on ahead and sort of indulge me in that part.

what context, instance? I would like if you could elaborate a bit on that?

 

Don't want to steer your answers go ahead. I like it, but getting passed this if you can just go off on that be wordy with it I would be grateful.

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Disable css and all you are left with is a plain structured layout to show content like a page from book with elements for headers, paragraphs, bullets, images horizontal line etc that enable that page to be shown on the web. With css the site will go from boring plain site (well in most cases) to whatever creative design you can come up with, well within reason of course.

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What I was thinking about when I wrote that was other than css html, there must be some difference in the sites that seem really great, maybe java scripting the whole entire site and having all of the site sort of compacted and scriptable.

 

I thought maybe that is how 90% of the better sites on the world network are put together.

 

I like most pages and find that when I look at the source code and other elements of them, they are usually ASP, ASPX and use some different things than I would expect to see. when I look at first.

 

I think this is a highly interactive site that is very impressive

Not perfect but, if a man punched keys and made this happen, that is pretty great, Falstad? Electr/DiagramBadass interactive

If I pasted the link right.

 

That is cool, and some that I have seen that enable you to use Hardware and software that is on a server somewhere. like remote audio equipment .

 

I hope you understand, I am not sure if most pages are hosted to display scripted content. or how most sites are (as you said presentation) "presented"

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Presentation refers to the visual appearance of the site, like colors, shapes, fonts and layout.

 

There are three client-side languages:

HTML for structure

CSS for presentation

Javascript for behavior

 

By separating your code into these three languages your site becomes much easier to maintain.

 

The only thing HTML is meant for is to provide a structure so that the CSS and Javascript may interact with it. It should describe the content that's in it, for example, <p> for paragraphs, <ul>, <ol> and <dl> for different types of lists, <section>, <article>, <aside> are all self-descriptive.

 

Once you have an HTML structure you can use CSS selectors to change the appearance of the page.

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I don't know the typical users setup for looking at pages and sites.

 

I was thinking though, using CSS for displaying elements that are not "needed" but are essential to your page design seems like it could be limiting; heres how.

 

If the bandwidth limitation of a device (bits exchanged that is known to the device owner) is too high, and the network is managed by a 3rd parties 3rd party, or something crazy. They may cut some of the css out in order to get the minimal text and basic content onto the page. I figure if you use html, the page will still maintain it's design perhaps.

 

example is if you have <ul> list items with images. that is something that could be cut in the transaction by a lot of things I am sure (like proprietary framework, or device sub network ).

when it comes to getting the url of an image from css it seems like you would have to about clock it perfect in order to not end at having the incorrect background image or proper display of it at all.

 

I don't know this but I kinda got a good solid feeling that it is better to have HTML as you would like it to appear and CSS elements that are simple tried and true.

 

What do you think?

Edited by number47

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HTML and CSS are both text which is small and does not take up much bandwidth. Images and video are much larger and more likely to load down a network. You can put your HTML and CSS into the same file.

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I wouldn't advise putting content in the CSS. The page's content should be accessible when the CSS is not available. But text being centered or not has nothing to do with how readable it is.

 

As for background images, they aren't needed. If your image is a relevant part of the content then use an <img> tag.

 

But as for formatting and layout, that's unrelated to the page's content and should be handled by CSS. There's no need for text color, element positioning, font size, background colors and such to be in the HTML.

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