Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
hisoka

understanding a mobile network concept

Recommended Posts

I have a mobile internet that is I used a sim card in an USB stick and plug it in my laptop to get internet . In the configuration page of the internet , I got , in the advanced settings  in the mobile connection

Auto Disconnect Interval(Min): 10

there are other options like 5 , 20 and 120

1) what is meant by auto disconnect interval or automatic disconnect interval ?

2) for what purpose is the auto disconnect interval made ?

3) Should I let the option to 10 or is it better to change it to 20 or  120 ? I mean what is the best option ?

Best regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I search for that, it sounds like the number of minutes of inactivity before it will disconnect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So after 10 minutes of inactivity , there will be an automatic disconnection from the internet . Here comes my second question , to which I got no answer , why is it made so that when a user is inactive for specific period of time , he will be , automatically,  disconnected from the internet ?

and the third question : should I change the option to 120 minutes ? like that if I am inactive for 30 minutes than I will not automatically be disconnected  , after 10 minutes , from the internet ?

Edited by hisoka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In most cases, mobile data is expensive and capped. If you go over the cap, its even more expensive.

An Auto-disconnect timer protects your wallet should you forget to turn off your data, by turning it off for you when you're away from the computer for a certain amount of time.

Computers (nowadays) have a large amount of programs that query to external servers in the background. If its left on all night, that can quickly add up if you're on a low capped plan. Especially if there are programs that like to update when your computer is idle.

 

You will rarely, if ever, need more than 10 minutes. The only times this would be applicable is if you were downloading something particularly large that would take longer than 10 minutes. In that case I would recommend you to download it when you have Wi-Fi. (At home or with the free stuff you get around the place). 
In any case that you would require more, it would be ill-suited for using the SIM data anyway.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here comes my second question , to which I got no answer , why is it made so that when a user is inactive for specific period of time , he will be , automatically,  disconnected from the internet ?

Ask the manufacturer of your internet device.  I didn't make it, so why would I know?  Do you think that there's some rule or law which requires them to do that?  Because if you're waiting for me to point you to a law which says that people who make USB internet devices are required to have a connection timeout, I don't have a law to point you to.

If you want me to use my brain, then I'm going to think that someone using a USB device to connect to the internet is probably using a mobile device, and it might be on battery power, so maybe, just maybe, it's a power saving measure.  I would think they also would have a way to disable the timeout, like the power management settings on most laptops let you disable various things if it is plugged in, but again my name is not Huawei and I do not know why they made the decisions they made.  Ask them.

In most cases, mobile data is expensive and capped. If you go over the cap, its even more expensive.

Look at that, another good reason.  Many things are possible with the power of independent thought.

and the third question : should I change the option to 120 minutes ?

Why do you expect me to make your decisions for you?  You know how you use the computer, so set it up so that it works however you want it to work.  I don't care how you set it up.  Make a decision and if it doesn't work for you then make a different one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

An Auto-disconnect timer protects your wallet should you forget to turn off your data, by turning it off for you when you're away from the computer for a certain amount of time.

By all due respect , it is nonsense : an internet service provider is a company . companies sell their products , in this case internet , to get money . So if I , as company , want to get money why should care of protecting my clients wallet ? In trading and business there is no emotions or generosity or moral values . Only one thing matters ,  for all companies ,  and that is the capital and profit . However , even if we assume what you wrote is right , my ISP want to protect my wallet  ,  again even so  it is still  nonsense because even if I am not disconnect from the internet in case of inactivity , the quantity of the internet I have remains the same . For example if I have 5 Gigabyte internet in an internet USB stick and I connect to the internet  , it works and I am , let say online in a website ,  if I sit up and let my laptop and go out for 1 hour and I am not automatically disconnected from the internet then the 5 gigabyte remains the same . This is by experience . I know what I am talking about

Quote

Ask the manufacturer of your internet device

If you do not know , you no need to be hard with me  . Because this is the impression I got from your above answer . I am only honest .   You can simply write : I have no idea . Again , this is my way of asking questions . It belongs to my character and until now it proved to be efficient for me . I cannot change it though   I am grateful for all the answers you provide me and I thank you from the bottom of my heart .

Edited by hisoka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

companies sell their products , in this case internet , to get money . So if I , as company , want to get money why should care of protecting my clients wallet ?

If this product was actually manufactured and sold to you by your ISP, instead of being manufactured by a company like Huawei which is not an ISP, then I imagine some customer complained and refused to pay a bill for service they weren't actually using.

I know what I am talking about

I don't think you do, because you're suggesting that you have "5 gigabyte internet in an internet USB stick", and that's not how this works.  You don't have "gigabytes of internet" in a USB anything.  The only thing the USB device does is connect to some provider.  How much traffic you actually use is measured from the other end.  And, if you have a bunch of things running in the background that you don't know about, then you may use it.  What if you leave your laptop online and leave, and in the background Steam decides that it's going to download a 1GB update for Team Fortress 2?  Now you come back and you've used another 1GB of data that you weren't expecting.  Believe me, I know what I'm talking about.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

then I imagine some customer complained and refused to pay a bill for service they weren't actually using.

Service like what  for example ?

Quote

How much traffic you actually use is measured from the other end

how is this exactly done ? can you explain me ?

and how is internet sent from this so called  provider to the customer through the USB stick ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Service like what  for example ?

Internet service.

how is this exactly done ? can you explain me ?

Network appliances like routers know how much traffic is being delivered to which IP address.

and how is internet sent from this so called  provider to the customer through the USB stick ?

"Internet" is not a thing that is sent.  You have an account with an ISP.  The ISP knows about your account.  When your computer uses the USB device, or modem, or whatever, to contact the ISP to get an IP address, it tells the ISP which account you are (if you want to know how, look up MAC address - the ISP knows which device you have to connect).  If you have a valid account, the ISP assigns an IP address to you and lets you on its network.  If you want to know what happens after that, look up internet backbones and gateways.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×