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A little confused


astralaaron
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Hello everyone First what I have learned is of course HTML, and I am in a class at the local community college learning Flash 8. But I would like to get into more advanced website design and be able to create shopping areas where people can use their credit card directly from my websites to purchase items, or to become members of the website and have access to member areas. I would like to be able to create forums like this one we are all typeing on also. and have webcamsThere are so many different languages and people are all telling me different things. some people are telling me learn php/mySQL - and others tell me mySQL is terrible and to learn microsoft access then from there go to SQL - some tell me dont use PHP and instead use ASP and ive heard about some program called PHPNUKE - then someone tells me to use JAVA APPS instead of writeing my own code..(I would really like to understand the code I am useing and would want to be able to write it myself) all this different information makes it so I do not know who to believe and which direction to work toward.I came across this website and It looks like there are alot of very smart people that post here and i would really appreciate your opinions! thank you-Aaron

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You have really high ambitions. I suggest you slow down a bit. First, learn CSS.Then start with something simpler then a shopping cart or a forum board. Like a simple CMS for example. No user interaction. Just an application where an administator can add and remove content without directly going into the source code of one or more files.At that point you'll realise you need a language that can interact with the server. The so called Server Side Scripting Language (or "S3L" as I like to call them). Almost any S3L can manipulate almost any database. ASP and PHP are the two most popular S3Ls. Others include ColdFusion, JSP (Java Server Pages) and many more.MySQL is probably the most popular database solution nowadays. It works with PHP and I believe with ASP too (though I'm not sure).What you choose depends mainly on the host that you'll find as well as personal preference. I mean, all S3Ls have the same capabilities, so it's not vital whether you'll select ASP or PHP. You'll still have the same new abilities.Most people here, and in many other forums are probably going to reccomend PHP though, as it can run on both the IIS webserver (made by Microsoft) and Apache, while ASP can only run on IIS, because ASP is too made by Microsoft.

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First, learn CSS.
thanks for the reply, what can CSS do for me?
You have really high ambitions. I suggest you slow down a bit.
Also, I did not expect to be able to do all of this right away obveously. I was asking what direction I need to work towards to do all of this. Edited by Jonas
Merged posts. Time between posts 08:38 AM and 10:05 AM.
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First stop, avoid posting two posts in a row like that... it doesn't seem right, that's all.What can CSS do for you... well... I'm a little tired of repeating the same thing over and over again, so let me show you the pages which show it best: W3Schools pages of course. I mean the HTML 4.01 Why and the next page as well. They will show you what can CSS do for you that plain HTML can't. And let's not forget the CSS intro page.

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First stop, avoid posting two posts in a row like that... it doesn't seem right, [/url] page.
if you look at the times of the "2 posts in a row" there is a time period inbetween. I thought about the second post while I was BBQing my dinner. I really dont apreciate your aditude it would have been better if you did not reply at all.and of course there is information on CSS and I have read and even experimented with some of it. I was asking that poster who told me because it was a little weird that he would say learn "CSS" when I was asking about doing things you would need to use databases and server language for.
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I prefer PHP over the other server-side languages because there is a larger community for it, there is a lot of help online and the official PHP site has better reference and documentation then I've seen with anything for ASP. One of the hallmarks of working with Microsoft technologies is that the reference and documentation is either so hard to find that it's essentially useless, or it's not there at all. PHP is much stronger with that. It's also free and open source and much more compatible then ASP is. The vast majority of open source web applications these days are written in PHP, so if you learn PHP then you can understand the code for the open source systems and modify it if necessary. MySQL is definately not terrible, it is one of the better database systems in general, and probably the best free database. You can spend several thousand dollars to get a licensed installation of SQL Server 2000 and still not be able to do everything you can do with MySQL. Access, on the other hand, is pretty useless for everything except instruction. Access is a decent tool to focus on databases and not worry about the interface too much, because Access has the form builder that helps you design the interface, but I would never use Access in any professional capacity, it's just not up to task. It's unstable and slow, but yeah, it's easy to learn. As far as "SQL" in general goes, it's an acronym for Structured Query Language and it's the language you use to communicate with the database. Nearly every relational database system uses SQL for data definition and data management, so if you learn SQL then you can use it with MySQL, SQL Server, Access, Oracle, PostgreSQL, etc. The different database systems support different subsets of SQL commands, but they all support some form of SQL.

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if you look at the times of the "2 posts in a row" there is a time period inbetween. I thought about the second post while I was BBQing my dinner. I really dont apreciate your aditude it would have been better if you did not reply at all.and of course there is information on CSS and I have read and even experimented with some of it. I was asking that poster who told me because it was a little weird that he would say learn "CSS" when I was asking about doing things you would need to use databases and server language for.
K... sorry... whatever.Well, I told you to learn CSS because you only mentioned knowing HTML and it's just not wise to move onto any S3L without knowing CSS first. CSS knowledge (in general) is never assumed in theese forums, as there are still people who extensively insist on using presentational attributes instead.
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I prefer PHP over the other server-side languages because there is a larger community for it, there is a lot of help online and the official PHP site has better reference and documentation then I've seen with anything for ASP. One of the hallmarks of working with Microsoft technologies is that the reference and documentation is either so hard to find that it's essentially useless, or it's not there at all. PHP is much stronger with that. It's also free and open source and much more compatible then ASP is. The vast majority of open source web applications these days are written in PHP, so if you learn PHP then you can understand the code for the open source systems and modify it if necessary. MySQL is definately not terrible, it is one of the better database systems in general, and probably the best free database. You can spend several thousand dollars to get a licensed installation of SQL Server 2000 and still not be able to do everything you can do with MySQL. Access, on the other hand, is pretty useless for everything except instruction. Access is a decent tool to focus on databases and not worry about the interface too much, because Access has the form builder that helps you design the interface, but I would never use Access in any professional capacity, it's just not up to task. It's unstable and slow, but yeah, it's easy to learn. As far as "SQL" in general goes, it's an acronym for Structured Query Language and it's the language you use to communicate with the database. Nearly every relational database system uses SQL for data definition and data management, so if you learn SQL then you can use it with MySQL, SQL Server, Access, Oracle, PostgreSQL, etc. The different database systems support different subsets of SQL commands, but they all support some form of SQL.
thank you very much for taking the time to make that post, you seem like you know what you are talking about.alot of good information!thanks again-Aaron
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K... sorry... whatever.Well, I told you to learn CSS because you only mentioned knowing HTML and it's just not wise to move onto any S3L without knowing CSS first. CSS knowledge (in general) is never assumed in theese forums, as there are still people who extensively insist on using presentational attributes instead.
no disrespectThanks for the post - appreciate it anyway, CSS can make a nicer looking site.I will start learning it also.
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