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ASP or PHP?


Elnof
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I'm trying to develop a site where you have to log in to veiw, but I'm unsure what language to use! Would PHP be better, or ASP? If anyone could help me, I'd appreciate it! Also, if you could tell me how to go about doing it, I have the basic idea, but I'm not sure about specifics. Thanks!

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I just found a blog entry with quotes from MS people saying that development of the ASP lanaguage has stopped it was still shipped as part of Vista and will continue to be supported for at least the next 10 years but they do recommend moving to ASP.Net (if you want to stay with MS technologies)

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What one would you suggest, Cold Fusion or PHP, I don't really care about the difficulty. I love to learn new languages, and difficulty has neaver been a problem for me... Exept for C++... That stuff was put together wrong!

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:) that's easy for me - ColdFusion. With CF8 in public beta now, you couldn't ask for am more feature packed release. Check out the post on some of the release highlights:http://w3schools.invisionzone.com/index.php?showtopic=13431But don;t take it from me, I have my own (well known here) biases. Here is a great article that might help you make a decision:http://coldfusion.sys-con.com/read/46362.htm :)
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I'll admit I also have a bias towards PHP, but if you check the thread counts in this forum it looks like PHP is the most popular (at least among users on this forum). It would make sense that a language that is more popular would have more resources available for learning and teaching.

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Read an article in a swedish computer magazine (Datormagazin, great magazine..) today, they listed the 20 most popular languages (source: Tiobe Programming Community Index (april 2007))..The 5 most popular was:1. Java2. C3. C++4. PHP (the most popular scriptlanguage...)5. (Visual) Basicothers on the list are: 8. C#, 9. JavaScript, 10. Ruby they also listed some others: 21. Pascal, 35. Smalltalk, 41. VBScript and 50. PostScript (last..) They didn't include ColdFusion in the article (so I guess it's somewhere between 21 and 49..), I guess you could google the listing...I've also read an article somewhere (think I got it with CodeProjects newsletter) which listed dead (or dying/almost dead, as things in this world never tend to die completely) "projects" in the "computer world" and, what I can remember, it listed ColdFusion as one of the dying projects (correct me if I'm wrong)...I keep to PHP (I guess I'm bias too) Have looked at Ruby and ruby-on-rails (have also used Perl, C/C++ [but not for web.., well once perhapss]), but I find that PHP gives me what I want in a way I like it...

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ASP (or ASP.NET) = No, no.PHP = Yes :)Okay, that's just my opinion. I don't like ASP or .NET because I hate MicroSoft and after what I have been told you can't use ASP or .NET with databases without having a program for Windows that costs money...+ I don't understand a thing of itPHP, because I love Linux. It's also free and not to mention it's open source :)

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I didn't know this was a popularity contest - if you look ounce for ounce the languages mentioned are going to be very similar in their overall functionality. Deciding which is right for you is only a matter of trying each out.I get very defensive, as you might tell, when it comes to ColdFusion. ColdFusion like an electric car - it has all the benefits, functionality, stability, and reliability of any other car on the road but just happens to be the right vehicle for 90% of the population.So, just because CF doesn't win any popularity contests doesn't mean you can't find support or that it won't be around. Adobe has clearly shown that is intends to invest in CF and there are plenty of communities out there. In fact, it is pretty easy to argue that CF resources are better because they are more concentrated.Anyway, I know I'm getting off topic - but confusing popularity with practicality will get me started every time.:)

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It isn't a contest, just stated facts (or statistics, there's a difference sometimes and some may argue that statistics isn't facts..). but this is fact: more popular => bigger community => more help to find. (more concentrated would perhaps be a plus, but it could also mean less accessable [for example translations etc.])I don't doubt that CF has some advantages, is stable, functional etc. and I wouldn't tell anyone to step away from it (i wouldn't tell them to use it either...), it's their choice. Only times I would tell someone to "step away" is from make webpages in C/C++, Perl (!, have tried it [both C/C++ and perl]...) and perhaps in ASP/ASP.NET (Not big fan of ASB, VB etc) and IE (hat IE, it has really bugged me these last days... FF for the people, boycot IE) and perhaps some other things...Personally I think the syntax of CF is ugly and "bold", I guess some see something in it, but I like "the logic" (don't doubt that it's there in CF too, just not in the form I like it) and "C-likeness" in/of PHP..In conclusion: use CF if you want, use PHP if you want, but don't select ASP/ASP.NET (or similar, etc) over PHP (or CF...)...

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I wasn't trying to say that PHP is any better then ColdFusion because it is more popular, only that

It would make sense that a language that is more popular would have more resources available for learning and teaching.
so, if someone is looking for a language to learn, it would be easier to learn a language where more people are learning it. I'm sure that ColdFusion can do anything that PHP can, but all things being equal PHP would be easier to learn just because of the amount of people learning it. I would say that PHP is easier to learn then ASP.NET for the same reason. Also, and this is just my opinion, but I also think that the HTML-tag-style syntax of both ColdFusion and ASP.NET controls will confuse people learning the language, it's important to understand that even though a file might have both HTML and PHP in it, the two are totally unrelated. I can tell that people are confused about this point when they ask if it's possible to have PHP write Javascript, or if it's possible to put PHP in the <head>, or whatever.
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I'd go with PHP. Going on experience, the vast majority of websites run on PHP +MySQL servers.Although, I will say Cold Fusion is used at 75 of the Fortune 100 companies websites.The thing with a PHP + MySQL combo is that you can very easily develope on Windows and Host on Linux. PHP is also widley offered by web servers.

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