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I think that after Rails has gotten so much of success on the Web, there must be a tutorial, if not a comprehensive one, then definitely a starters guide or something??

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Your server doesn't have to support RoR to have a tutorial on it. Same applies for any language.
True. But there are three important factors to understand here:a.) w3schools is privately run by a small web development shop in Norway and the resources they have for any of the languages they do not currently offer is slim to none. So they would have to depend on volunteers or contract individuals to code the tutorials. If they did go that route then there would be a large concern about the consistency in tutorial methodology - they vendor/volunteer they selected (hypothetically) would have to be code the applications the same way the ASP and PHP tutorials were. That might not seem difficult but I can tell you from plenty of experience that it is a very certainly unlikely that you will get anyone other then yourself or your own team to get to code an application/tutorial they way you have and would have done it.b.) Even if you had the tutorials in other languages written, having them hosted on another server is far from ideal and only complicates the maintenance of the tutorials and the user interface they are supposed to sit in. Keeping track of two hosting accounts or finding one that will host all four languages on one account without it being a dedicated server is not likely or very costly.c.) maintenance and enhancements to the added tutorials that related to coding language they are not used to can quickly become a thorn in the site. If they have to rely on a third party to maintain the tutorials they are subject to any number of risks. Even if the community were to step up and provide top notch tutorials (which I know I could do -for instance- for coldfusion) there is still the issue of maintening them especially after an upgrade (like recently with ColdFusion 8 - it would take me a while to refresh all the CF tutorials here if I had done it for them.There is a lot that goes into just providing the number of tutorials these guys have managed to throw together. I can really appreciate the work they have put into it and the work needed to maintain it. As much I personally would like to see tutorials added for RoR and CF we just have to accept the limitations that exists today.Granted, this could very well change in 10 minutes or two weeks. As I know how contract companies work, they might very easily land a job that required RoR or CF and therefore take on some additional staff accordingly for the project. This might lend it self to a tutorial being written - but thats about the greatest chance I see.Sorry. :)
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There are many OO languages like ROR that is one of the simpler. I use to say, if you manage C++, you aslo handles C# and Java as I regard them as simplified C++.There are many ROR resources on the internet already and a Rails forum. In addition, there is already a fairly extensive litterature on ROR.

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There are many OO languages like ROR that is one of the simpler. I use to say, if you manage C++, you aslo handles C# and Java as I regard them as simplified C++.There are many ROR resources on the internet already and a Rails forum. In addition, there is already a fairly extensive litterature on ROR.
As someone who has/does work with C++,C#, and Java, I respectfully would say your statement is not even close to being true. C# and Java are very similar but C++ is only similar in syntax. Beyond that there isn't much about them that is the same.
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But I think that C++ and Java are Object Oriented.But the think about RoR, is not only about OO. That was in Ruby when it was made in 1994. What I really like about it is the separation of Model, Controller and View. This maybe very common, but I have never used something like this before. Also the syntax of JS when writing using prototype.js is quite similar to how we write Ruby.

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Also I dont know if I can write Server Side stuff on C++ or C#. You can write on J2EE ..right?

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Ok..I didnt know that

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As someone who has/does work with C++,C#, and Java, I respectfully would say your statement is not even close to being true. C# and Java are very similar but C++ is only similar in syntax. Beyond that there isn't much about them that is the same.
I have no problems understanding C# and Java code. Without knowing C++, I would have had problems. All of them are OO.
You can use C++ or C# with .NET to write ASP.NET pages, or you can use them to write an application you can compile and have the server run that.
Yes.Configuration is as far as I understand very easy in ROR. That has caused me a lot of trouble in other languages. SitePoint has published a book on ROR that explains how to make a digg site (with code download). I have found some of their books valuable.Three important ROR developments principles are mentioned there:
  • Convention over configuration.
  • Don't repeat yourself.
  • Agile development.

The second is an overall important one in OOP. I think that principle is most general in BETA, where everything is a pattern.

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  • 3 months later...

If you like the MVC concept and you like PHP check out CakePHP.

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