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HTML e-mail (newsletters) and spam filters


giblik1
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Hi...Trying to figure out whether there's any way to code HTML e-mails to get past spam filters. We have a weekly newsletter that goes out and one of our advertisers is saying that they get ours with no images, but others fully intact. I believe this is a client-side issue (i.e. that the mail client or recipient mail server has to mark us as 'safe') and that there's not anything we can do about it. However - need either some verification or options.Any help would really be appreciated.thanks!k-

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Uh... what method are you using to send your mail? And are your images embedded (i.e. attached) or absolutely linked to your server?

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I use Thunderbird as an Email Client and it blocks images for me. I can't remember (or find) the settings to change the behaviour because I kinda like it that way. I prefer to select what I see in my mail. Too much crappy Spam around. Really, how much Viagara can a guy use???

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Right - but these are people who are electing to receive the newsletter, so it's content they want, but can't receive properly.

I use Thunderbird as an Email Client and it blocks images for me. I can't remember (or find) the settings to change the behaviour because I kinda like it that way. I prefer to select what I see in my mail. Too much crappy Spam around. Really, how much Viagara can a guy use???
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Well, you will jsut have to tell them to fiddle with their settings so that it allows e-mails from your domain to display images...

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We do offer a "can't see this" link in the e-mail [...]
I think like the others have said this comes down to individual user settings on different email clients. But of course these now tend to be imposed by default without users necessarily understanding it is so. Your best shot may be to supplement your "can't see this" with a statement advising users to refer their email software supplier's website if they need help enabling images in their emails.
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thanks!

I think like the others have said this comes down to individual user settings on different email clients. But of course these now tend to be imposed by default without users necessarily understanding it is so. Your best shot may be to supplement your "can't see this" with a statement advising users to refer their email software supplier's website if they need help enabling images in their emails.
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We have a weekly newsletter that goes out and one of our advertisers is saying that they get ours with no images, but others fully intact.
That's all you need to know. If some people get it fine and one guy is not getting the images then it's definately a setting somewhere with the one guy. Either the email server coming in is stripping out image tags, or a filter somewhere along the way is doing the same, but tell them to talk to their IT department if they want to see images. Someone at that organization knows why it's doing that.
Really, how much Viagara can a guy use???
Clearly you've never been to Singapore.
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Thank you...I've been trying to explain that, but no one but our IT guy believes me!

That's all you need to know. If some people get it fine and one guy is not getting the images then it's definately a setting somewhere with the one guy. Either the email server coming in is stripping out image tags, or a filter somewhere along the way is doing the same, but tell them to talk to their IT department if they want to see images. Someone at that organization knows why it's doing that.Clearly you've never been to Singapore.
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Yeah, it's pretty basic logic. I run into a lack of understanding that all the time. A company I work for has several software products online that are being used by literally tens of thousands of people every day. When a single person has a problem they assume it's a problem on our end instead of a setting on their end. If the product does X in 30,000 situations, and it does Y in 1 other situation, it just might be the case that that one situation has a problem, not the product.

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Things are the same all over I guess! I sort of straddle the line of marketing and IT, so I get it from both sides ;-)Thanks for your help though - forwarded your response (more detailed than most) on to our sales guy, who can hopefully use it to convince our advertiser that this is happening with everyone's newsletters, not just ours.Ahhh...technology.

Yeah, it's pretty basic logic. I run into a lack of understanding that all the time. A company I work for has several software products online that are being used by literally tens of thousands of people every day. When a single person has a problem they assume it's a problem on our end instead of a setting on their end. If the product does X in 30,000 situations, and it does Y in 1 other situation, it just might be the case that that one situation has a problem, not the product.
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