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All These Languages, My Head Is Going To Explode!


gobbly2100

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Hey,I just wondered how people cope with trying to remember all the different syntax's of all the languages?I have learnt HTML and CSS and now I am working on JavaScript, PHP and Perl but I just wonder how much I am expected to really remember of a language, I mean I know it is good to have a book reference always but is that all you use to remember it all?

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Well, that's why people use references. I check up on W3Schools when I can't remember some PHP or javascript functions.Between HTML, CSS, Javascript, (PHP,ASP,CGI) and SQL you can make basically anything on the internet.

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You are only expected to know the basic syntax of each language and the basic structures (read - functions) that you use most often. For all other functions, you should only be aware of if such a thing exists or at least if it should. The exact function name, it's arguments and support are to be reffed to from a reference, as there's no way you could remember everything any language could do.

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What boen_robot said, and some languages have similar syntax, functions/names, concepts, etc. You will see OOP (Object Oriented Programming) techniques and other ways of writing code. HTML, XHTML, XML look alike, but have different purposes. SQL is supported by some of the biggest names in databases with some minor changes.

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Of the 7 programming languages I know, 5 of them use syntax that is closely related, e.g. the dot syntax, which is most often associated with OOP languages. If you study most of them intently, you will find that a majority will probably have some base taken from C, despite for C actually not being an OOP language. This makes a good deal of sense, because in reality, it is very marginal in how one defines a language, rather the higher impact is in how its implemented. So a lot of them won't differ too greatly, because what's common now works, and people can actually focus on what they want to achieve through it instead of the nit picky stuff. Asymmetrical markup languages aren't that varied either, at least in structure. Their purposes and how they are written are different, but you shouldn't incur much problems because every single piece is required to be well defined. Also, you might want to try simply taking notes in a notebook. You remember things at least 20% better when written by hand, and this will provide you a convenient way to review things offline. I still have my notebook from when I learned XHTML and CSS, which I use to this day because its handy and quick. Furthermore, when you do take notes, summarize things in your own words, it makes the concept yours then. Word for word detail is arduous and excessive, especially if you are already well familiar with something, e.g. when I was learning PHP, a majority of my notes said "same as in C++", for a lot of the things like if statements and loops. Lastly, practice is a necessity. Never try to learn more than 1 section (you decide what a section looks like to you) without first doing any examples your source gives you and then creating your own challenge. You should at least do two sections of code, the exercises given to you, and ones you come up by yourself.

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I have learnt HTML and CSS and now I am working on JavaScript, PHP and Perl...
My advice would be to not take so many similar languages in at once. For example, JavaScript and PHP look extremely similar, and I believe PHP is based heavily on Perl, or at least closely related. But each language will inherently be different from the next in some significant way (probably in both implementation and syntax), or there would only be one of them.I learned HTML, CSS, and JavaScript pretty close together, but they're three completely different languages. If I had tried to learn JavaScript and PHP at once, I might have gotten the major function names and syntax rules all mixed up.P.S. I'm curious... Why do you need both PHP and Perl? (I suppose you could ask the same of me for C++ and Java -and the answer would be that C++ is native, thus faster and more capable, Java is portable- but I haven't been exposed to Perl that much, partly because it's not here.)
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To me, it boils down to two things. First and foremost, you really just need to understand what each language is capable of doing. Understanding, and I mean thoroughly, what they can do is important to understand what YOU can do. Second, you simply need to know and feel comfortable with good reliable references - behind online or off-line language specific documentation or online discussion boards where you can throw issues around and get help.All in all, do not put undo pressure on yourself to memorize all the syntax and rules - just code. The more you do it the more you will retain this information. What you are concerned with should be expected after years of coding, not expected before you've gotten your feet wet.

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