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Test the RDF/XML coding


yoonsingng
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RDF, be it noted in XML or not doesn't "work" as in "it doesn't do anything". It only stores data in a machine readable form, much like a tranditional database, but makes it more logical.You need to write your own application that does the actual work.

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RDF, be it noted in XML or not doesn't "work" as in "it doesn't do anything". It only stores data in a machine readable form, much like a tranditional database, but makes it more logical.You need to write your own application that does the actual work.
what you mean is I need to write the xml, xsl with the rdf, then publish it on web and test it?and uses the semantic search machine to search for it?
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what you mean is I need to write the xml, xsl with the rdf, then publish it on web and test it?and uses the semantic search machine to search for it?
Something like that, yes.RDF is, as it's name implies a "framework" for creating other description standards. Look at Dublic Core for example. They are defining a standard set of "core" descriptions anyone might need at various places. There's FOAF which specifies additional metadata structures for representing people, etc. etc.The "semantic web" part comes in that your vocablulary could be specially interpreted by an aware agent OR generically interpreted by an RDF aware agent.Unless you know an RDF implementation for your language of choise, you need to write the parser yourself. And unless you have a generic RDF parser, you must write your own one that would at least process an XML notation of RDF.
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opps~ problem again~ need to make sure something..now that i have the RDF/XML code, actually how can i display it?since it was written in XML, then should be using XSL?then how is the coding for the XML look like? I mean the structure
It will look however you make the parser display it like.Ohh... just look at RSS for god's sake. You can look it with the browser, an email client, a web applicaiton, etc. etc. etc.It's all the same data source, but with different representation in each parser (i.e. RSS reader). In addition to what RSS 2.0 has, RSS 1.0, which is based on RDF, offers generic RDF implementations the ability to also parse that data in a generic fashion.Think XHTML. XML tools offer a generic mechanism to query the file based (using XPath), while XHTML rendering engines allow you to display it, editors allow you to edit it and preview it, etc. It's a similar deal with RDF. RDF notations, whether noted in XML or not can be queried by RDF parsers (using SPARQL), whereas specialized RDF applications like FOAF for example can be read by FOAF readers.So... if you want, you could use XSL to make sence out of the RDF data. But you then only restrict yourself to the XML notation. Of course, thankfully, you don't enforce it on others, since the valid XML syntax, so yes - go use XSL if you must. Just know it's not the only way to do it, and personally, even though I'm an XSLT fen, I don't think it's the best way to do it.A specialized S3L parser that quiries the data with SPARQL from a DB would be best. Though to be realistic, there aren't much (if any) good implementations of SPARQL so far, at least not for PHP, which is my S3L of choise.Once queried, generating XML from the data source and transforming it with XSLT (or simply "echo"-ing it) should be easily doable.
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