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MathML


Tefkros
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Hello,It would be great if w3schools promoted Math markup language by which we are able to post scientific documents on the internet without having to convert equations to images, or worrying if the equations are compatible with most web browsers. It's a pity that many famous browsers like IE don't support mathml without 3d party tools.thanks

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A MathML tutorial would be interesting, but, as you say, it's not natively supported by IE (and btw, it's not natively supported in Safari either). This alone is a big showstopper.But SVG suffers from the same thing, hence Adobe SVG Viewer. Having said that, I completely agree with you. There should be a MathML tutorial. As for what player to reccomend to IE users... maybe MathPlayer?

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Hmm... anyone up to writing a PHP MathML renderer? :)Wonder how hard that would be.

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Hmm... anyone up to writing a PHP MathML renderer? :)Wonder how hard that would be.
W3C have an XSLT to transform MathML into XHTML. Is that the type of rendering you're refering to, or do you mean MathML to image?If the latter, I see no point with browsers' native support today. As long as you make sure IE gets a plug-in, pretty much all browsers will have MathML.If the first, then you could use MathML in an <object/> and give the MathML document inside it a link to this stylesheet (or rather, your own copy). Browsers with MathML renderers will use their renderes, and browsers without one will use the stylehseet.
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If the latter, I see no point with browsers' native support today. As long as you make sure IE gets a plug-in, pretty much all browsers will have MathML.
Not likely, all browsers except Opera and Firefox support MathML partially and from my experience those that use IE(f****** 80%) are either too old to "learn" how to use a new browser,or too stupid (maybe both), therefore i doubt that one who uses IE would even know how to download a plugin.There are of course some nice tools for writing scientific documents, like SciWriter and OpenOffice Math, but again due to the lack of mathml support from browsers, most equations are badly rendered.
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Not likely, all browsers except Opera and Firefox support MathML partially and from my experience those that use IE(f****** 80%) are either too old to "learn" how to use a new browser,or too stupid (maybe both), therefore i doubt that one who uses IE would even know how to download a plugin.There are of course some nice tools for writing scientific documents, like SciWriter and OpenOffice Math, but again due to the lack of mathml support from browsers, most equations are badly rendered.
The same way you make people download Flash Player, there's a way to make them download MathPlayer, so IE is not really an excuse. There are even guides on the MathPlayer website as to how you may detect MathPlayer's presence and promt for download when it's not available. In combination with IE's CCs, you can make it for IE only.
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