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I need help


sweinkauf13
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I really need your input  

13 members have voted

  1. 1. How hard is php? (1- completly easy; 10- Extremly Hard)

    • 1
      4
    • 2
      0
    • 3
      3
    • 4
      2
    • 5
      1
    • 6
      1
    • 7
      0
    • 8
      0
    • 9
      1
    • 10
      1


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Hello,I am very talented with html and css but i wanted to learn another language. So i have been hearing things about php. Please try to predict how hard it would be for me to learn php. Also if you have any recomadations for me, like learning a different language before php. Please let me know. Also if you do not know php, please do not vote in my poll.Thank you,Youngwebmaster

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That's the way I did it, and I actually waited about 3 years before taking up PHP. I simply wasn't interested because I was having fun with JS. But I gradually understood that anything more than a personal website would need some server scripting. Once I finally took a PHP class, the syntax seemed almost identical to JS (and Java, which I had taken in the middle). A few things took some adjusting, but I mostly didn't run into them at first.

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On an absolute scale considering all programming languages PHP isn't really hard. You don't need to interact directly with the memory, it is untyped, has a very simple syntax, is procedurally-based and only midly object oriented, and doesn't require linking in the traditional sense. But straight from HTML and CSS it is a big jump because as JSG said they are completely different.

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I think it isn't that hard if you have a programming sense of C or Perl. JavaScript is a scripting language and it is also somewhat easy. PHP itself isn't hard to learn but it helps to have some programming/scripting sense.

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I don't find Perl's syntax similar to the PHP's one. Also, I'm not sure that they're meant to do the same thing.I've got two books (they're not awesome, though, so I wouldn't recommend them) related to both JS and PHP. I find JS more of a syntax introduction, than something that should be use in web development. If you want to build web pages which have lots of tricks, JS will mostly do for you, but if you want to go further, developing web applications, MOD's for applications, or even CMS's, you'll definitely understand the need of PHP. But PHP alone is not as useful as mixed with a database, which means that you'll have to learn SQL as well. But mate, you'll have to put a lot of work and dedication into it, because you won't learn this overnight, and you'll have to do some more work on your own, because there's no better teacher than yourself. When you're trying hard to learn something, and you learn it without asking (many) questions, you'll have a better understanding of what you're doing.One more thing: try not to just copy/paste the examples from books/website, but go further and prove yourself that you've understood what's been written there.

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Javascript and PHP are for completely different things, they both have their place. Javascript makes the interface more functional for the user and PHP lets the application interact with the server. Here's one example, this uses PHP to get all of the actual data (the RSS feeds), and it uses Javascript to show everything to the user and let them interact with the data.http://extjs.com/deploy/dev/examples/feed-viewer/view.html

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in my opinion it is kinda hard to vote in this poll. depends on what you will be learning. the basic stuff is like a 3 level and teh hard stuff is like 8. also html and css is nothing like php. not to mention the fact that it is kinda stupid to learn php if you aren't implementing it with a MySQL database (though of course php is not limited to that)well i ranked it 6

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I don't find Perl's syntax similar to the PHP's one.
They are of course VERY similar, since they are both based on C and all were originally intended to run on Unix, so their approach to system-oriented stuff (like file routines) are very similar.If what you're calling "syntax" is in fact the much larger library of built-in functions that comes with PHP, well, you're correct, but you're calling it the wrong thing. The built-ins are one of PHP's strengths over Perl. But the syntax is really just modern C-like (by which I mean it includes a native string type). All the curly braces, the do-while loops, the for loops, the if conditionals, they ALL LOOK LIKE C. (And no surprise, Javascript looks like them both, at a nuts-and-bolts level.)
Also, I'm not sure that they're meant to do the same thing.
Well, no. Perl predates the WWW and was designed as a multi-purpose scripting language, a way of tapping C (the underlying interpreter and THE Unix programming language) from the command line but without worrying about memory management.PHP postdates the WWW and was specifically designed to generate web pages. It can do more, but that was its original directive. All of this is reflected in the original name ("Personal Home Page Tools") and the fact that the author, Rasmus Lerdorf, created it to replace Perl scripts he had been using previously to the same end. No surprise, hah hah, he wrote the original PHP interpreter in C.If you're looking at it from the perspective of Cobol or Pascal or Visual Basic, all these languages I'm discussing are part of a big happy family with enough in common that their differences seem trivial.One significant difference between today's PHP and Perl is the way each has developed. PHP uses the Zend engine for interpreting, and Zend is wicked fast. Perl, developed by a different community for different reasons, doesn't have such a fast foundation. Not yet. The next version (release date unknown) promises to be much faster. And since one of its strong suits is regular expressions, a speed superiority there may make some difference for some applications. You'll notice that the PHP manual specifically recommends against PREG functions unless there is no other way. Regular expressions are built into Perl, on the other hand, and, to the novice, Perl scripts can be very confusing because of that.So far as I know, there are no plans to extend the built-in function set of Perl to even approximate PHP's. I believe the older, more open-source model that characterizes Perl (developed by a bunch of hippies, really) prefers the idea of shareware libraries. In theory, importing only the functions you need (and not the whole bloody set) should make the language very fast indeed. AS LONG AS the underlying interpreter is fast, which at present it is not, at least compared to PHP (and really that's only important if you plan on iterating a lot of loops hundreds of times--your basic check-a-few-conditionals sort of page is not noticeably slower.) But I think the next incarnation will be faster.Now, one supra-syntactic difference between the languages comes in the way they integrate with HTML. Someone coming to Perl from PHP without a good guide may find Perl hopelessly archaic. It's not. Clever use of heredoc syntax (not so often used in php) makes Perl very friendly to HTML. (Without it, you've got print statements all over the place, and if that's what you're used to, then yeah, Perl looks ugly. But that's just Perl done badly.)Returning to the issue. Syntactically, Perl and PHP and Javascript and C are all kissing cousins, and to say otherwise is just to be silly. The first 3 are especially similar because they are loosely typed and don't require memory management (sort of the same thing). It's the library/DOM routines they are associated with that make the big differences. But that's not syntax. And getting a handle on it is not programming skill as much as memorization.I confess, Perl does have a few original constructs that make it sort of cool. Where else can you find a statement like this:shut_up() and go_home() unless ($var == "fun");But that's extra, not different. Here endeth the rant.
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Thank you for all of your input, but i think i'll be doing the following:Learn javascript, then learn php. And then i'll be at this spot all over again.Thanks again,Young webmasterP.S. I'll probebly use books to learn the langauges.

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I learnt php with Larry Ullman's PHP for the world wide web, they have exemples and step by step projects that really throw you into how php works, from that I started some of my own projects and it was a nice quick start and not hard at all

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way i learn is i get a reference book and create a task list like for php i started small and then im gettin biggerechoincludepostcontact formregister scriptactivation scriptlogin scriptssession with loginsearch engineim currently on login scriptsnote: thats not entire list i just went off memory

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I learnt php with Larry Ullman's PHP for the world wide web, they have exemples and step by step projects that really throw you into how php works, from that I started some of my own projects and it was a nice quick start and not hard at all
Thank you, i will look for that book.
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hmm echo before include....I used include as my first php line, I made it so my menu (all in html) was included at the exact point in all the pages so I went from old time webmaster to next generation time saving php using webmaster ! include is GREAT !really though, the 'include' function is I think the function that does the most obvious work for a webmaster / site maintenance worker, see here: http://buildingblocksoftheweb.com/learn-php.phpand here: http://buildingblocksoftheweb.com/make-your-website.phpthis is my site I'm trying to get up and running but I have so many other sites i can't find the time to complete one fully... maybe the site project can demonstrate why you could need to pass from html to php

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