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Yea I'm only 16 and I think I'm pretty good at CSS. Though there are some questions I need answered (ALL)1: Is <img> inline by default?2: How do sprites work?3: What does zoom:1 do?4: Is 12px font == 1 em?5: Name ALL the block level elements that are used frequently6: Same but inline this time7: What browsers support inline-block and what is it8: Can inlines be placed inside block levels?9: Vice-versa of 8.10: Can you give me an overview or a small tutorial on expressions?

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1. Yes2. By definition sprites are dynamic images. There are no "sprites" in CSS, though you can use JS to make a normal image act like a sprite.3. It is a CSS 3 property that defines the magnification of the current image. A value of 1 is the actual size.4. No. Ems are relative units that are dependant on the current font size. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Em_(typography)5. <div>, <p>, <h1> ... <h5>, <pre>, <table>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>. (at least I use those alot)6. <span>, <img />, <code>, <abbr>, <a>, <br />7. http://www.brunildo.org/test/inline-block.html - basically it is a block, but doesn't break.8. Yes9. HTML inline elements cannot be placed inside HTML block elements validly, but if you make an inline element block using CSS then the validator won't catch you. Not recommended though.10. Err, as in regular expressions? http://www.regular-expressions.info/

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1. Yes2. By definition sprites are dynamic images. There are no "sprites" in CSS, though you can use JS to make a normal image act like a sprite.3. It is a CSS 3 property that defines the magnification of the current image. A value of 1 is the actual size.4. No. Ems are relative units that are dependant on the current font size. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Em_(typography)5. <div>, <p>, <h1> ... <h5>, <pre>, <table>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>. (at least I use those alot)6. <span>, <img />, <code>, <abbr>, <a>, <br />7. http://www.brunildo.org/test/inline-block.html - basically it is a block, but doesn't break.8. Yes9. HTML inline elements cannot be placed inside HTML block elements validly, but if you make an inline element block using CSS then the validator won't catch you. Not recommended though.10. Err, as in regular expressions? http://www.regular-expressions.info/
1) Thanks2) Thanks3) Thanks4) Yea ok I figured thanks.5-6) Thanks7) Thanks for the link8) Awesome thanks9) Ok.10) No, expressions in CSS. It combines CSS and JavaScript.
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Expressions are only supported by Internet Explorer, so I don't recommend learning them, they won't work in the CSS validator either, they're not standard.I certainly don't want to waste my time teaching the wrong way to do things.

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There's no "proper way" with expressions. The only standard substitute for it is to use Javascript itself to fix your page, but it will then display incorrectly for users who have Javascript disabled.For example:

<div id="box">Box</div><script type="text/javascript">//Make the box the height of the window - 100pxdocument.getElementById("box").style.height = (screen.availHeight - 100) + "px";</script>

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Don't worry about expressions. if you need to dynamically set properties do it with a JavaScript script, e.g. instead of

#element {	height:expression(window.offsetHeight);}

Do

<script type="text/javascript">document.getElementById("element").style.height = window.offsetHeight;</script>

and place it after the #element element is written.Edit: Ingolme got there first. But curious: why do you need to use expressions?

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window.offsetHeight doesn't work, I was just using it as an example :)

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Well can you give me an example, of where it takes the parents height, and subtracts 200 px from it? It can be any example like that and no I'm not copying it for homework or anything. It was just a random example.

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This javascript would work on an object with id "box".document.getElementById("box").style.height = (document.getElementById("box").parentNode.offsetHeight - 200) + "px";

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I think it would be something like this:height: expression(document.getElementById("box").parentNode.offsetHeight - 200);Hopefully this runs after the "box" element has loaded. If not, then I don't think it can be done.

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You probably could put it on an element with the style attribute.Why such interest? Like I said earlier, this isn't a very recommended method for good reasons.

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Just to be clear. What you are discussing works ONLY in IE. However useful it is, it excludes a huge cross-section of users. Apart from everything else, this means that you are likely to be ignored by most of the regular contributors on this board. And FWIW, it also makes you the puppet of an arrogant corporate giant, which is in direct contradiction to the original spirit of the web, which was to be INclusive rather than EXclusive. (Some of that's my opinion, some of it's just fact.)

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Technically they are CSS and JavaScript combined. You can PLACE them in CSS so thus I need to learn them.
Point out which part of the CSS 2.1 specification they are in. :)What I mean is that they aren't part of the language defined by the W3C as "CSS".
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I'll prove they are part of CSS and JavaSCriptheight: expression(document.getElementById("box").parentNode.offsetHeight - 200);height: is CSSexpression(......) onward is JavaScript.I'm not saying I'm going to use it much or even at all. I just want to clear it up.

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:) that's like saying that "blahblahblah" is part of PHP because I can write
$string = "blahblahblah";

And that "blahblahblah" is also part of CSS because I can write

element:after {	content:"blahblahblah";}

Expressions are not part of the official CSS syntax. Is that unambiguous enough? :)

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