Jump to content

I Need Help Creating A Dating Website


Recommended Posts

Hello everybody i been looking all over trying to figure out how to go about creating a website for dating.I would love to know the steps involved for creating a such website.I am currently learning html code and other stuff on w3schools.com and intrested in creating everything my self.If anybody could be my guide i would really appreciate it. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're just learning HTML now, it will probably take you a while to get the skills necessary to build a large site like that. In addition to HTML, you'll need to be proficient in CSS, a server-side language such as PHP, SQL for a database, and possibly Javascript. The steps to create any large site are the same - 1) design it, 2) build it. For what it's worth, I've got a system set up with over 80,000 users and I've spent around 1800 hours designing and building it, and I already had a computer science degree when I started. Don't expect a tutorial on how to build a complete site though, you just need to be good enough at software design and programming where you know what you need to do in order to accomplish a specific task (such as users registering and logging in, sending messages to each other, updating profiles, etc).Also for what it's worth, the amount of HTML code compared to other code in the system I was talking about is less than 1% HTML. It's nearly split 50/50 between Javascript and PHP, but it's particularly heavy on Javascript for a "regular" site.

Link to post
Share on other sites
If you're just learning HTML now, it will probably take you a while to get the skills necessary to build a large site like that. In addition to HTML, you'll need to be proficient in CSS, a server-side language such as PHP, SQL for a database, and possibly Javascript. The steps to create any large site are the same - 1) design it, 2) build it. For what it's worth, I've got a system set up with over 80,000 users and I've spent around 1800 hours designing and building it, and I already had a computer science degree when I started. Don't expect a tutorial on how to build a complete site though, you just need to be good enough at software design and programming where you know what you need to do in order to accomplish a specific task (such as users registering and logging in, sending messages to each other, updating profiles, etc).Also for what it's worth, the amount of HTML code compared to other code in the system I was talking about is less than 1% HTML. It's nearly split 50/50 between Javascript and PHP, but it's particularly heavy on Javascript for a "regular" site.
Thank you for your quick response. I am so looking forward to making my site I am so excited like a little kid and yes I know whole a lot of nothing. You said only 1% is html and rest is split 50/50 between javascript and php. I was wondering what if I wanted to use ASP.net program that's free you think you could give me sme info on ASP is ASP similar to what php, sql, and javascript is or is asp something tottally different. You see I don't even know what the difference between them is and what purpose they surve maybe just a little. Another question I have is lets say I am creating a dating site I have home page registration page email page page for users own profiles that they playaround with add pictures and the email they receive for their activation anyways my question is how do all these thing work as one websit
Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me try to break it down a little.HTML - the page structure; the actual content and the containers that the content sit inCSS - how the page looks; fonts, colors, backgrounds, etcJavascript - dynamically updating the page; mouseover effects, popup windows, draggable items, etcPHP - server-side processing; interfacing with a database, reading and writing files on the server, sending email, submitting forms, etcASP is another server-side language like PHP. It's a completely different language than PHP, but it's used for a lot of the same things, the two languages can generally do anything the other one can. At this point I think about 60% of servers actually online support PHP and about 40% support ASP.In a "traditional" site, you would usually have a lot of HTML and a lot of CSS. Most sites don't need much Javascript, but it's becoming more and more common as people try to make sites that act more like a desktop application than a website. Some purely information sites don't need a server-side language like PHP, but if your site has content that you can update, or if it does user login, or sending email, or really anything requiring submitting a form, then you need a server-side language to process the form or do whatever you need to do. The reason the site I was talking about is using Javascript instead of HTML is because Javascript can create the same containers and elements that you would write in HTML. On my login page, instead of writing a regular HTML login form, maybe like this:<form action="login.php" method="post"><input type="text" name="username"><br><input type="password" name="password"><br><input type="submit" value="Log In"></form>Instead of doing that, I'm using a Javascript library that creates all of that for me. This will probably look pretty confusing, but this is the actual code that creates the login form on my application, instead of using a regular HTML form:

	var login_buttons = [	  {		text: "Log In",		formBind: true,		scope: this,		handler: submit_login	  }	];	if (this.lms_opts.user_register)	{	  login_buttons.push({		text: "Register",		scope: this,		handler: show_reg	  });	}	login_buttons.push({	  text: "Reset Password",	  scope: this,	  handler: show_pass_reset	});  	var login_frm = new Ext.FormPanel({	  labelWidth: 75,	  labelAlign: "right",	  bodyStyle: "background: transparent; padding-bottom: 10px;",	  border: false,	  anchor: "100%",	  url: "io.php",	  id: "login_form",	  items: [		{		  xtype: "panel",		  layout: "column",		  border: false,		  bodyStyle: "background: transparent;",		  items: [			{			  xtype: "panel",			  columnWidth: .5,			  border: true,			  bodyStyle: "background: transparent; margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 5px;",			  autoScroll: true,			  height: this.lms_opts.login_box_h - 80,			  html: this.lms_opts.login_text			},			{			  xtype: "panel",			  columnWidth: .5,			  border: false,			  bodyStyle: "background: transparent; margin-bottom: 20px; padding-left: 5px;",			  layout: "form",			  defaults: {				xtype: "textfield",				allowBlank: false,				anchor: "95%"			  },			  items: [				{				  xtype: "panel",				  border: false,				  anchor: "100%",				  bodyStyle: "background: transparent; margin-bottom: 20px;",				  html: "<div>Please enter your username and password below to log in.</div>"				},				{				  id: "username",				  fieldLabel: "Username",				  name: "username"				},				{				  id: "password",				  fieldLabel: "Password",				  inputType: "password",				  name: "password"				}			  ]			}		  ]		}	  ],	  buttons: login_buttons	});

So that's the reason my application is so heavy on Javascript, but normally a site would use the standard HTML markup to do those things. It's not required though.

Another question I have is lets say I am creating a dating site I have home page registration page email page page for users own profiles that they playaround with add pictures and the email they receive for their activation anyways my question is how do all these thing work as one websit
That's where experience comes in. When you start working on this you'll want to set up test pages for each different part. Like first you'll want to set up a login page that only logs in a user and keeps them logged in, so you would have a login form page, a page that processes the login form, and a page where you can show whether or not you're logged in. And maybe a logout page. You test with that until you've got it working, then you can move onto the next part, maybe sending email. So you could set up a page that has a form with maybe name, subject, comments, etc, and have it submit to a page that gets the information, checks if it's filled in, and sends an email. Once you have both of those, then you can integrate them together and make sure that in order to send an email you need to be logged in also.So it's just doing things in parts. There's a saying that the way you eat an elephant, is one bite at a time. Once you get your site designed and have all the features written out where you know what the different things are that you want to be able to do, then you break those up into single tasks and work on each task individually until you know how to do that one part, then you can worry about integrating everything together.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's not really the popular opinion, but I always recommend books. There are several good tutorials online to get you started, but I think it's a lot easier to go beyond just the basics if you have a good book. HTML and CSS you can probably just learn online, there actually isn't that much to learn there. Once you learn the basic idea, all you need is an online reference to see what's available (e.g., the CSS font reference for looking up which font options are available to use).For books, I like O'Reilly as a publisher, so here's their Javascript section:http://oreilly.com/javascript/The Definitive Guide or The Good Parts might be worth picking up.PHP:http://oreilly.com/php/Programming PHP is a good book, and so is the Web Database Applications with PHP and MySQL book.ASP.net might be a little more difficult to find good books on, because it's such a broad topic. Neither ASP nor .net are languages, they are application platforms. You actually write the code with another language, such as C#. So if you wanted to learn how to write a C#.net application, you would need to learn about the .net framework in general, about ASP.net specifically, and about C# specifically. Here's the .net section for O'Reilly though:http://oreilly.com/pub/topic/dotnet

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...