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Xml In Combination With Sql?


RivkaS
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I am right now learning the use of databases and have so far a faint idear of what xml files are and how they look like. I have a really hard time to understand how to implement them, it seems very complicated - correct me if I am wrong.What I would like to know is - is it still used or is it already outdated?I also did my share of Exercises using SQL-Server-2005 with Visual Studio 2005.I would like to know if I have to or can use these two in tandem?Do SQL-queries and xml-files go together or are they tow totally different concepts?Sorry if I sound dumb, but I am completely confused.As an end note, I really start to like the SQL Queribuilder of Visual Studio but I have a hard time to befriend the xml files mainly because of the teacher presenting the material in a chaotic manner.

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SQL and XML can work in tandem. SQL could store XML data, and XML could store SQL queries in one form or another. In addition to that, they serve two separate purposes, so they could work together to achieve a common goal.I'd avoid using Visual Studio for SQL if I were you... unless perhaps you plan to use MS SQL as your database. Try writing queries manually. W3Schools has an SQL tutorial which covers the aspects of the SQL language that are the same across all SQL implementations (MySQL, MS SQL, etc.).Learning both XML and SQL at the same time can lead to disastrous results to your health (headaches, confusion... in extreme cases depression) as you've already found out. Take them one at a time. Learn some SQL, practice some SQL. One you feel comfy with it, start exporing XML, including XPath, and then see how you can parse XML in whatever your environment (e.g. PHP, ASP.NET, JAVA, etc.) is. Alternatively, go the opposite way - learn XML and XPath, see ho you can parse XML in your environment, practice some XPath queries, some possible "pseudo databases", and once you feel like you've got the hang of it, start exploring SQL.

Edited by boen_robot
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Avoiding VS with SQL is not a option since that is what the school teaches and demands, or is there also a difference between SQL 2005 and SQL? As far as I understood SQL2005 is already a part of VS2005 and the same seems to be true for 2008.My Microsoft booklet says "Visual C# 2005 Express Edition with Microsoft SQL Server Express Edition" ... ? As far as your analysis of headaches and confusion are concerned - yes..., no comment... :)

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Avoiding VS with SQL is not a option since that is what the school teaches and demands, or is there also a difference between SQL 2005 and SQL? As far as I understood SQL2005 is already a part of VS2005 and the same seems to be true for 2008.My Microsoft booklet says "Visual C# 2005 Express Edition with Microsoft SQL Server Express Edition" ... ? As far as your analysis of headaches and confusion are concerned - yes..., no comment... :)
I think you're confusing MS SQL with SQL as a language.SQL is the language used to query (i.e. manipulate) databases. It is the same across all kinds of SQL databases. However, different database engines extend it to include engine specific features. Still, the stuff you're generally going to need is available everywhere.MS SQL is the database engine made by Microsoft. Like all SQL databases, you can query it with the SQL language. Visual Studio Express (regardless of whether we're talking about 2005 or 2008 or whatever) uses a special edition of MS SQL called "Express edition". It's a "cut out" version of the full featured "MS SQL Server Enterprise". It accepts only the standard SQL language, plus only a few Microsoft specific (out of the many Microsoft specific) extensions.Having said that, there's no "SQL 2005". There's only "Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition", and that is different than "SQL - the language".Even though your school demands "MS SQL 2005 Express Edition", are you sure this means they also teach and require that you use "Visual Studio C# 2005 Express Edition"? Even if so, ask (and/or find) if Visual Studio has any place where you can edit the SQL query manually. Instead of working with the visual query builder, try to work with that text instead. Note that a lot (if not all) of the actions you can do with the query builder have a corresponding text equivalent.
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I think you're confusing MS SQL with SQL as a language.
probably - I am only since yesterday getting the parts of the puzzle apart.
SQL is the language used to query (i.e. manipulate) databases. It is the same across all kinds of SQL databases. However, different database engines extend it to include engine specific features. Still, the stuff you're generally going to need is available everywhere.
Thanks for the explanation, I will try to figure that out a bit more.
MS SQL is the database engine made by Microsoft. Like all SQL databases, you can query it with the SQL language. Visual Studio Express (regardless of whether we're talking about 2005 or 2008 or whatever) uses a special edition of MS SQL called "Express edition". It's a "cut out" version of the full featured "MS SQL Server Enterprise". It accepts only the standard SQL language, plus only a few Microsoft specific (out of the many Microsoft specific) extensions.
aha, so it's the "cheap" version of the full version. I have the full version but all the lessons are in Express edition, so I do the exercises on that as well, even though the lessons (video) are presented on the full version.
Having said that, there's no "SQL 2005". There's only "Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition", and that is different than "SQL - the language".
oh, okay, I will remember that for the next time I ask.
Even though your school demands "MS SQL 2005 Express Edition", are you sure this means they also teach and require that you use "Visual Studio C# 2005 Express Edition"? Even if so, ask (and/or find) if Visual Studio has any place where you can edit the SQL query manually. Instead of working with the visual query builder, try to work with that text instead. Note that a lot (if not all) of the actions you can do with the query builder have a corresponding text equivalent.
Don't ask what the school demands because that is illegal as it only can be! 1) Yes, VS has a place to edit the SQL query manually, it is called "Stored procedures" and if I am right with the lecture that I have watched today that can even be done on the main.cs but I will have to go into that a bit more. 2) I used the query builder because that is what the Microsoft booklet for beginners suggested and it was the first time I began to understand what was going on in the lessons, so that was a good start for me. Now I am on the way to explore the text version but I want to make sure that I understand it right the first time and don't waste another 2 months on it.
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