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justsomeguy
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it might spell the end of IE6 for the average user but it will have to be pried from the cold dead hands of enterprise sys admins. I'd like to meet some of these programmers that thought it was a good idea to build for IE6 only (preferably in a dark alley).

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Indeed. But I imagine that as soon as the VPs can't watch Youtube at work anymore, they'll magically find all that funding for the software re-write. Another possible side-effect is that other websites might follow Youtube's lead, with the "but youtube did it" excuse for not wanting to dedicate an extra 10 or 20% of development time for IE6 support. When the VP can't log into his back account from work, he'll get IT on the phone pretty quick.

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Meh, my workplace blocks Youtube.
AND they still use IE6? Why haven't you contacted the IT admin? If you have - what's his excuse for not updating to IE7 or IE8?
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Yay! This makes me so happy, every part of supporting IE6 was a pain, even just having it for testing!I will definitly be following YouTube and be dropping IE6 support on my websites.~DtD

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AND they still use IE6? Why haven't you contacted the IT admin? If you have - what's his excuse for not updating to IE7 or IE8?
Erm, I am one of the IT admins. New computers get IE8 but we don't push upgrades to older machines for compatibility reasons (and because we are sort of busy with other things, and found it really difficult to automate the IE8 installer). But newer IE versions still don't allow us to watch Youtube :) (though for some reason Safari on OS X gets straight through our access control system...) Edited by Synook
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Erm, I am one of the IT admins. New computers get IE8 but we don't push upgrades to older machines for compatibility reasons (and because we are sort of busy with other things, and found it really difficult to automate the IE8 installer). But newer IE versions still don't allow us to watch Youtube :) (though for some reason Safari on OS X gets straight through our access control system...)
Should've figured that you of all people will be from the IT team :) .If you have multiple versions of IE within the company, doesn't THAT create compatibility problems? Or do you have an intranet site that only the IE6 users happen to use?As for automating the IE installer, the IEAK 8 appears to be the solution - it takes the original IE installer, and after you specify the configuration you want, it generates a new (MSI) installer that can be distributed via various means. See IE8 deployment guide for details.
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Guest FirefoxRocks

There's too much traffic to the TechCrunch article I assume, it's "temporarily unavailable" at the moment. A Google cache of the page shows that Twitter is going to drop support soon too, and that Digg is considering it.This is great news! The more that bigger sites drop support for IE6, the less people will use it. Even Windows 98 users should use Opera instead.Now I'm just wondering here. The system requirements for IE7 and IE8 are the same, so why should people not upgrade?

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Most people are uneducated about the whole thing. Either they're entirely clueless about IE8, or just misinformed. One guy here even said that he wasn't installing IE8 because he thought IE7 was better. So not everyone has a clue about what's going on, that's probably why a lot of people are still with IE6 and IE7. IE6 is mainly held up by businesses though, not home users. Check this graph of browser version usage over the previous 30 days:http://gs.statcounter.com/#browser_version...090617-20090716You'll notice that periodically the lines either go down or go up. Check which versions have lines that drop periodically - IE6 and IE7. Check which versions have lines that go up periodically - IE8 and Firefox 3. That indicates to me that the periodic changes are the weekends, so on the weekends fewer people use IE6 and IE7, and more people use IE8 and Firefox. That's probably because they are using IE6 and IE7 at work, and IE8 or Firefox at home. You can see the same trend in the overall browser graph:http://gs.statcounter.com/#browser-US-dail...090617-20090716That shows generally that IE usage falls when Firefox rises, and you can see smaller increases at the same time from Safari, Chrome, and Opera.

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There are some compatibility issues for IE8 with some sites that were designed for IE7... the website my dad uses for quotes (on auto body work) still wont work with IE8

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