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Round Tables?


kirbyweb
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Round? Round corners or do you mean circles and ellipses?You're much better off using <div> elements than tables. The techniques that make round corners usually have images, the ones that don't have them use a whole lot of elements for each row of pixels, sometimes it's generated with Javascript to reduce the amount of mark-up.

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I just mentioned it before.The only way you can make round corners without images, that I'm aware of, is having several elements, each one behaving as a row of pixels. By assigning a margin to each one you can tell it where to end.Here's a quick example:http://dtfox-tests.totalh.com/roundcorners.htmlAgain, I recommend you forget tables and try to learn CSS layouts because they load faster and take less bandwidth.

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When I first learned tricks for making round corners and such, I thought they were pretty cool.Now I don't. They require a lot of overhead for a very small visual effect. Creating multiple divs just so you can add multiple background images is just bad practice. Creating dozens or hundreds of divs so you can create the illusion of curved edges is even worse.I confess, most of my objections are philosophical.On the other hand, I have also observed libraries that create round corners but make it impossible to interact with the base element. Form inputs cannot be used, links cannot be clicked, text cannot be selected, and so on. That's just wrong, and certainly something to investigate before investing a lot of time learning how to use a new library.When an element is of a fixed size, you can use a single .png background image to give it the appearance of round corners. The .png allows the image to layer over other elements while preserving transparency and anti-aliasing.When the size depends on context, you can add proprietary CSS to create round corners and/or drop shadows (same principle). Border-radius and shadows are currently supported by Firefox and Safari. If you use this technique, you should design so that the thing looks good in browsers that don't support the CSS. (Browsers that don't support the special CSS simply ignore it.)

Edited by Deirdre's Dad
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