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Running A Server


thescientist
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So I'm really excited to be getting some servers from a buddy of mine this weekend, and I really can't wait to practice maintaining my own databases, learning about network admin stuff, RAID configs, etc. I don't have any ambitious plans of hosting my own site (atm), I would just like a little playground to explore in. I'm into music recording, so setting up drives to use as backups would be a big perk. Some of the things I would like to do are:1) practice maintaining/"admin"-ing databases2) using the server to backup music recording projects3) learning more about server software 4) in the future: hosting my own website, and to also maybe broadcasting music or playing live shows, jams, etc via webcastSo what would I need to get me started for the first three (or all four) in terms of software? I know I need server software, so I was looking at Apache, but is that separate from needing something like Windows Server? I was looking at this, FreeNas, would that be OK? Or would Apache do it all? After that, I would plan on using mysql client to maintain the database.Actually, it looks like there are some offerings like Ubuntu Server Edition that would do it all, is that right? So does it just depend on what kind of service you want to use? I'm only doing this for personal enjoyment, so if it can be free that would sweet. For all I know, I just realized they might still have the software installed on them, but I would like to try starting from scratch if its not too much of an undertaking.

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Ok. any recommendations for a good OS? Could I just use XP with Apache? I feel foolish asking but I was under impression if it required OS, than it had to be specific server OS software?So I would need something like FreeNas or Ubuntu Server Edition and Apache?

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XP, why not, but Ubuntu server edition is free!FreeNAS is a bit limited (after all, it was designed to only be used for NAS systems).

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Cool, thanks for clarifying that. I was under the impression it would have to be specific server OS software. I do have XP, but, I'm all about learning new things.Looks like Ubuntu and Apache it will be! (I've never done anything with Linux before)

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Server OSs do provide certain advantages, such as stronger security (including things like more complex firewalls, support for network authentication schemes such as LDAP, and faster turnaround on patches), fault-tolerance, better multi-core support, more powerful virtualisation, and server-oriented services [built-in]. E.g., compare the stated feature sets of Ubuntu's desktop and server editions, and have a look at what they focus on.Nevertheless, to simply respond to data sent over a network (what a server does) all you need is a program, usually a service (Windows) or daemon (Unix) that binds a certain port and listens for connections on it, which is something all modern (i.e. post-IP :)) OSs allow for.

Edited by Synook
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