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What SQL to use?


ckrudelux
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The products mentioned are all different types of Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), each which support slightly different but mostly compatible versions of SQL.It mainly depends on the rest of your platform - for example, if you were creating a .NET application destined for Windows Server, then I would venture that it would be more convenient to use Microsoft SQL Server ("MSSQL") than, say, MySQL. Similarly with PHP and MySQL (and the LAMP stack) - many hosts don't offer anything but MySQL with Linux PHP hosting.Also, certain RDBMS support different features - for example, PostgreSQL and Oracle have in-built procedural languages that afford more flexibility than just stored procedures.However, if you are writing a native OS X application, then SQLite is already all there - no additional work required.

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The products mentioned are all different types of Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), each which support slightly different but mostly compatible versions of SQL.It mainly depends on the rest of your platform - for example, if you were creating a .NET application destined for Windows Server, then I would venture that it would be more convenient to use Microsoft SQL Server ("MSSQL") than, say, MySQL. Similarly with PHP and MySQL (and the LAMP stack) - many hosts don't offer anything but MySQL with Linux PHP hosting.Also, certain RDBMS support different features - for example, PostgreSQL and Oracle have in-built procedural languages that afford more flexibility than just stored procedures.However, if you are writing a native OS X application, then SQLite is already all there - no additional work required.
but why use MYSQL instead of PostGreSQL I have looked a bit on the web and PostGreSQL is said to be better on handling large archives then MYSQL or is it what PostGre's strength is it weakness?
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It's much less common than MySQL. Also, there are more tools for managing MySQL databases, and it is easier to get support*.* Especially enterprise support. MySQL AB (i.e. Oracle) have a well-defined contract-based support structure with the resources to back it up - something that PostgreSQL can't match.

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It's much less common than MySQL. Also, there are more tools for managing MySQL databases, and it is easier to get support*.* Especially enterprise support. MySQL AB (i.e. Oracle) have a well-defined contract-based support structure with the resources to back it up - something that PostgreSQL can't match.
I see.
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