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html5/css3


peterdreilly
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I don't know a website right now, but once you read about XHTML/HTML5 and CSS2/CSS3 the differences become obvious. To briefly summarize, XHTML is HTML written in strict XML semantics (closed tags, quoted attributes, etc.). HTML doesn't require you to close your tags or quote your attributes. HTML5 added some cool features to HTML that make HTML interact more with the browser's behavior.CSS3 is simply the most recent CSS standard. The W3Schools' CSS3 tutorial briefly outlines the CSS3 features very well.

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I don't know a website right now, but once you read about XHTML/HTML5 and CSS2/CSS3 the differences become obvious. To briefly summarize, XHTML is HTML written in strict XML semantics (closed tags, quoted attributes, etc.). HTML doesn't require you to close your tags or quote your attributes. HTML5 added some cool features to HTML that make HTML interact more with the browser's behavior.CSS3 is simply the most recent CSS standard. The W3Schools' CSS3 tutorial briefly outlines the CSS3 features very well.
Thanks Fmdpa,Im already using xhtml. As there is no site that extolls the benefits of one over the other, I will have to do the comparison myself. I like the discipline of xhtml (retired programmer ) so shall stay with that aspect even if the benefits of html5 entice me into its clutches.I shall check out css3 and if this is the current standard I shall move forward with it.Though it is progress, considering my use of features beyond the basics, it sometimes seems to be change simply for the sake of it.Perhaps I need to start developing more intricate web sites to justify such progress.Regards
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I shall check out css3 and if this is the current standard I shall move forward with it.
Just to clarify, CSS 3 is not the most recent standard. CSS 3 is still a work in progress and has not become a standard yet. CSS 2 is the most recent standard.There are a lot of features in CSS 3 that are supported by all the major browsers, but it would not be wise to rely solely on these features for your site. If you use any of them, you should have a fallback in place for older browsers that don't support it.
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XHTML is dead. Work on the standard has stopped indefinitely. HTML5 is the next standard, and the HTML5 doctype is supported everywhere. The good news is that the HTML5 doctype supports XHTML syntax, so you won't have to change what you're doing.HTML5 is also a work in progress. Many features are widely supported; many are not.The thing to note is that it's not a matter of choosing one over the other. HTML5 mostly adds to what you've been doing; it doesn't really change it. (A few elements still permitted in older versions of (X)HTML have been eliminated, but just a few.) The most widely supported features are actually in the JavaScript API rather than the markup itself.If you want to support IE7-8, you are wise to see what HTML5 features are supported, and which are not. IE7 is a dinosaur, but it will be alive for a while yet. As of April, it ranks 8.5% of all browsers in use, according to w3counter. That's a number you can't afford to ignore.Most of us are learning HTML5, but we are actually implementing very little of it. Visit the most popular sites. You'll see a lot of HTML5 doctypes being used, but very little HTML5 markup.As for discipline, good developers have been following most of the XHTML rules for a long time, with the usual exception of the / in self-closing tags, which breaks the HTML 4.01 doctype that a lot of us still use (but, as I said, it is legal in HTML5).

Edited by Deirdre's Dad
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  • 2 weeks later...
Indeed it should be. Might be worth mentioning in the suggestions forum...
Far as I was told CSS3 is made out of several modules. Actually meaning it is CSS2.1 but with more functions added to it. What means that the page is correct when it claims that CSS3 is the latest standard. That it is not fully implemented yet in all browsers has no meaning, CSS2.1 is also not fully supported by all browsers.
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