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Transports, Wrappers, and Filters


iwato
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QUESTIONS: Would it be correct to say that . . . 1) Transports are the different protocols used to establish, maintain and quit connections between nodes on a LAN or WAN?2) Wrappers are the different protocols used to communicate different kinds of information once a connection has been established?3) Filters are a means to limit the information that is transferred when using a specific transport and wrapper?Roddy

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Those are generic terms, what's the context? Are you talking about the OSI model?
I am not familiar with layers, but I allowed the URL that you gave me to provide me with a brief introduction. Whoever created the notion would probably feel very at home in Washington, D.C. where the mentality appears to be top-down control.Actually, I am trying to get a handle on the use of PHP stream functions. More recently I have taught myself how to set up three server sockets: one for my local Apache host server, and one for each of my two virtual host servers that I use for testing. Interestingly, with no specification other than the host name and port I obtain the following local host information when I make a call to the stream_socket_get_name() function:1) xxxx::abc:defg:hijk:lmno:EFGH2) 127.0.0.1:WXYZ3) 127.0.0.1:ABCDas the socket address of my real and virtual hosts, respectively.Question ONE: Is the address 127.0.0.1 a standard address for virtual host servers?Question TWO: To what address does Item #1 refer? Is that my machine's MAC address?Roddy
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Whoever created the notion would probably feel very at home in Washington, D.C. where the mentality appears to be top-down control.
It actually was defined in D.C., but by a guy from France (then again, D.C. itself was designed by a guy from France also). It's not about control though, it's about separation.
Is the address 127.0.0.1 a standard address for virtual host servers?
127.0.0.1 is the loopback IP, it always refers to the current machine. It is the IP address equivalent of the host name "localhost".
To what address does Item #1 refer? Is that my machine's MAC address?
MAC addresses are 6 groups of 2 digits. It looks like the format you wrote would correspond to an IPv6 address.
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It's not about control though, it's about separation.
Separation may be its purpose, but it is achieved through control. When a layer can only receive information from the layer below and give to the layer above, then information flow is one-way. This is control.
127.0.0.1 is the loopback IP, it always refers to the current machine. It is the IP address equivalent of the host name "localhost".
This was helpful, as it explains why the IP address for both of my virtual hosts is the same.
MAC addresses are 6 groups of 2 digits. It looks like the format you wrote would correspond to an IPv6 address.
This corresponds well with my own discovery.Thanks, Roddy
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