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Designers Are Programmers?


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I have just learned HTML and CSS. They are very comprehensive and easy to learn. But as we all know, to make a fully functional website, one person needs to know Javascript and PHP too. I find javascript very hard to understand. I'm almost done with the javascript tutorial and I'm still in the dark with it. Is PHP so hard too?Do designers also learn javascript and PHP, and do programmers also learn HTML and CSS? Are there jobs for just designers and jobs for just web programmers?Which of the four above to you guys know?

Edited by T1000Android
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Most designers have art skills, they make the actual design in a program like Photoshop. Programmers work with programming languages like Javascript and PHP. HTML and CSS are not programming languages. In a given project, where one person designs the layout, and the other person programs the interactive parts, either one can do the HTML or CSS. HTML and CSS aren't really skills that you can base a career on. Too many designers know HTML and CSS and too many programmers know them for someone to be able to make a living where they can write HTML and CSS but they can't create a layout or they can't program. Personally, I don't like design. I can make a website do whatever you want, and I can turn any design into a website, but I won't make the design myself. I'll let a professional handle that.

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I completely agree with JSG. While I have the programming skills, creative designs just don't come naturally to me. As for Javascript and PHP, they can be difficult to pick up for someone who is a novice to programming. I'm speaking from experience because when I look back at my first attempts at using Javascript, I cringe at the obvious lack of understanding I displayed in my code. I'd recommend that you move on to PHP because it has a gentle learning curve. Many of its concepts carry over to Javascript, so it could possibly help you understand JS better. Most importantly, practice, practice, practice. When you actually use JS instead of reading about it, it aids the learning process significantly. As with a musical instrument, once you pass a certain point, the light will turn on and you will be able to do almost anything you want. I'm finding that I enjoy programming Javascript more than PHP now that I've become familiar with it. It is incredibly flexible and powerful. Yes, designers work a lot with Photoshop and not usually with any code. However, something you may want to consider is front-end development. Front-end developers work a lot with CSS, HTML, Flash and Javascript. Actually, the current trend has been choking out Flash and replacing it with Javascript. Many very cool websites have been designed lately with jQuery, and Javascript library, and CSS3. An excellent website that shows ways you can use jQuery and CSS3 to create attractive designs is Tutorialzine.

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Personally, If I can avoid jQuery, I do it. I feel that downloading the whole library for a couple of little things is not worth the bandwidth.

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If you never programmed before I'd avoid JavaScript until you get the hang of something like PHP instead. JavaScript resources are scattered all over the web and the language gives you a lot of freedom which also leaves opportunities for you to continuously shoot yourself in the foot. Talking from my experiences of course.

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Yes, I use it with discretion. If I just want to use the jQuery selectors and maybe a couple CSS assignment shortcuts, I'll choose the more verbose plain JS since including the whole jQuery library isn't worth it. However, if my design includes lots of fades, animations, etc, I'll use it. It's worth noting that there are smaller JS libraries out there that serve specific purposes if you don't need the whole jQuery library.

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Great responses guys!!!! You have put my mind at ease about javascript. Its great to know that PHP will help with javascript , actually, CSS helped with HTML a lot too. I didnt really get the style="" in the HTML tags until i realized they were CSS elements. Sansana, there is no point in dropping javascript now as i am almost finished with the tutorial and by the way, i dont just read about the things i learn on this site, i do every example in the tutorials and write down whats relevant and explanations in the same document. For example: when i was learning HTML and CSS, i progressively built a huge web page full of examples and explanations for each of the tutorials. Its like i have my version of them saved on my HDD, and now im making the same for javascript.

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For example: when i was learning HTML and CSS, i progressively built a huge web page full of examples and explanations for each of the tutorials. Its like i have my version of them saved on my HDD, and now im making the same for javascript.
That's great! When I was learning HTML, I made a web page with pretty much every HTML element on it. It helped a lot.
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Oh no, I would never say drop JavaScript all together I'm just saying don't assume all programming languages are structured like it. Having a database for your site is common but not mandatory. You don't have to learn and master the inner workings of MySql or any other platform to use it, a simple client like phpmyadmin can make things a lot easier. Of course if your like me you would probably feel more comfortable understanding the SQL syntax in which case then the SQL tutorials at W3Schools are good for an introduction but you would need more vendor specific tutorials (Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra etc)

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If you plan on making script that interact with the database, then you might as well learn SQL basics at the same time. phpMyAdmin is good for management, but if you create a login script or anything that you want your site to do on it's in regards to database, then you will need to implement some basic queries into your code. You can still do a lot with only a few key commands though, and W3Schools does a decent enough job with their PHP/SQL tutorials.

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Yes, you I would recommend easing in to SQL with PHPMyAdmin. I prefer to only do things like creating tables and backups in the PMA. However, you will need to know some amount of SQL code to let PHP interact with the MySQL database (or whatever DB system you are using). Most PHP tutorials and books will include an introduction to SQL just because so many people use SQL and PHP together. One thing you will need to do before you start trying out PHP is install a development server on your computer.

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