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Questions to your Client / Employer / Yourself before Starting a Project


amitamberker
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Hello Everyone, I wanted to start this Thread sometime ago but however - "Better Be Late Than Never".What are the "Must and Mandatory" 5 Questions you would ask your Client or Employer or Yourself before Starting a Project?

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These are the five I always try to ask. 1) Do you prefer any third party software to be integrated?2) Social Media? Yes, No?3) Blog/News?4) How would they like their contact page set up. Contact Form? Phone Number? Address?5) CMS. Some people assume you are going to do this for them without asking for it.

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CMS. Some people assume you are going to do this for them without asking for it.
thats so true
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The question that set's the tone for our work is "how much more profit can you handle?" Nobody has ever told us, "thanks, but we're good". We never take jobs that make us tinker at the margins.

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The question that set's the tone for our work is "how much more profit can you handle?" Nobody has ever told us, "thanks, but we're good". We never take jobs that make us tinker at the margins.
Hi niche,Okie, I understood. But still, what are most important 5 Questions you would ask your Client before Starting their Project?
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1) Do you prefer any third party software to be integrated?2) Social Media? Yes, No?3) Blog/News?4) How would they like their contact page set up. Contact Form? Phone Number? Address?5) CMS. Some people assume you are going to do this for them without asking for it.
As a beginner I find this list pretty intimidating. Third party software? Social Media? Blog/News? And all this added to a CMS? I've only begun to look at CMS's and they look like a mess to properly configure. I can't imagine adding a bunch of stuff to a CMS.
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I find it Increasingly unnecessary to wonder whether my price is too low or to high when I know the track record of my client's overhead structure. For example, if I'm creating a commerce site, I know the payback multiplier MUST be at least 20:1, in a retail situation, for my client to be profitable. Failure to produce on that stat will lead to economic failure for my client guaranteed. Requirements will vary by category and a business' specific situation. That means, in this example, my client must earn $20 for every dollar they spend with me and on every other dollar they spend on their site just to break-even. That's axiomatic and non negotiable if my client is to profit from my work. Otherwise, a commerce site turns into a not-for-profit site which is OK if that's the explicit understanding at the beginning of the job. Do not be fooled. The only reason a business ever hires a vender is ultimately to make money. The more money the better. Ace that question and the other four take care of themselves. In a nation of supposed capitalists, It is a terrible irony that this analysis is almost always missing especially when it's so easy to do.

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That's exactly what I'm talking about. I'm just pointing out the most common common ground is profit. Generally, that's just as true for the charities as it is for the for-profits even when they won't admit it. Profit is the high ground and the path to the biggest profits (for you and your client) always go through an their overhead structure whether you're selling coding or cotton balls. Knowledge of a prospect's , or client's, overhead structure is how you coop the other guy and make them do what you need them to do. That kind of knowledge disarms their bias. You'll consistently make the sale because the other party will recognize you're already inside their organization. The open secret is overhead structures are surprisingly standard whether you run a hospital or a cleaning service. If you ask the usual questions they'll see you coming and use their bias to dodge you or grind you. Their overhead structure gives you a certain path to the most money for you and your prospect or client because you're using their back door. Everyone knows back doors are notoriously undefended. Plus, you get to hit your competitors where they're not.

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Hello Everyone :)Please Participate...Thank you.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

As Chris Coyier stated... You should know your prices. If you are going to make websites for clients you need to know your prices for certain features, it shouldn't be based on your client (unless it is a big dog who can fork up the dough, obviously they are coming to you.) You can't fear that your price will cause "Sticker Shock", your clients are coming to you so they think you can deliver. So unless your prices are just ridiculous you'll be fine, if they so no thanks, to bad for them. They lost your great services.

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