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New Error in php


divinedesigns1
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what does this error means?

( ! ) SCREAM: Error suppression ignored for
i dont have anything suppression as far as i can see in my code, also
Undefined offset: 1 in C:\wamp\www\albumfakeness\gallery.php on line 43Undefined offset: 2 in C:\wamp\www\albumfakeness\gallery.php on line 43
what does it mean offset? how would i know if its an offset or not? Edited by DDs1
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an offset is refers to a value in an array. $abc[0] is an offset.
ok i believe i know what is causing the problem so ill print_r(); and var_dump() to see whats happening thanks richie
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As for the "Error suppression ignored for" notice. This means that you have (or your host has) configured PHP to ignore the error suppression operator (you know, the "@"), and show errors anyway. This notice essentially means that a "@" was found, and because of that setting, it is being ignored, so you're being notified that, if you happen to see an error originating from that line, you're only able to see it due to that setting.BTW, using the "@" operator in general is a bad idea. It's best to test for the possible error conditions beforehand instead. There are very few cases where that's not possible, and in those, the use of @ should be immediately followed by result inspection (e.g. if a problematic function would return false on failure, check if the result was false), and error handling.

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As for the "Error suppression ignored for" notice. This means that you have (or your host has) configured PHP to ignore the error suppression operator (you know, the "@"), and show errors anyway. This notice essentially means that a "@" was found, and because of that setting, it is being ignored, so you're being notified that, if you happen to see an error originating from that line, you're only able to see it due to that setting. BTW, using the "@" operator in general is a bad idea. It's best to test for the possible error conditions beforehand instead. There are very few cases where that's not possible, and in those, the use of @ should be immediately followed by result inspection (e.g. if a problematic function would return false on failure, check if the result was false), and error handling.
ok thanks
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