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error handling


jimfog
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I prefer to set error mode to Exception and catch that on failure.

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That doesn't matter, mysqli::query also returns false if a query fails, right?

So you think $all_query_ok=true; is redundant?

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I wasn't suggesting that, I was just suggesting that whether you are using PDO or mysqli is irrelevant for the example in post 23. You can use a variable to keep track of whether or not there were any errors, or you can just test each result to find out. It doesn't matter if you're using PDO or mysqli.

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Ι think this code must be OK now...I am going to test it either way:

   $connection->autocommit(FALSE);      $result1 =$connection->query("insert into users values (NULL,'" .$name. "','" .$lastname . "','".$email."','". $passwd."','". $hash."','4')");      $result2=$connection->query("insert into business_users values('".$connection->insert_id."','".$address."' , '".$url ."','".$phone. "','".$city. "','".$municipality. "','".$buztype. "')");            if(!$result||!$result2)      {$connection->rollback();       $connection->autocommit(TRUE);       echo 'transaction failed';       return false;      }      else          {          $connection->commit();          $connection->autocommit(TRUE);          }
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After the queries are finished, should I always use autocommit(TRUE)?

Or the commit method is sufficient to turn on again the autocommit feature of the db? It is not clear to me.

 

Provided the fact of course that I do want to set it that way.

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