Jump to content

Database


Recommended Posts

A use case for a process? Well, your browser is a process that lets you view this web page.

Hm...

In programming you use threads so that your process can have multiple things being done independently from each other at the same time. Javascript doesn't have threads because it's a very high level language.

What of server side process and thread? Teach me Ingolme!
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 94
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Let me clarify one other thing: I am not, and I don't think I have represented myself as, an expert in databases. I am not trying to assert that SQL is the only option you have. I am responding instea

OK, let's look at the wall of text you posted and then summarized yourself in a single sentence. First, that is a big "if". Many applications have nothing to do with consuming or producing XML data.

Another 32 bits, obviously.It's the maximum instruction size that the processor can support. 64-bit processors have been mainstream for only a few years now, so there are still a lot of 32-bit applica

Guy, I'm best described as a novice, so I can say little. Your adamance to change's fascinating. It seems you're teaching yourself though, so it can be along road; but why not accept lifts here and there--must you walk all the way? Find a way to learn first before you criticise. Sorry if I sound rude.'The illiterates of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearned and relearn'.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

'The illiterates of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearned and relearn'.

I'mma make this journey productiveful soon as possible. But I'll be learning for the rest of my time to come.
Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need to worry about processes and threads, they're not strictly related to web development. They're a software development concept.

 

You have to stop, go back to W3Schools.com and learn the languages you see there. Forget about operating systems and processes and just learn to code.

HTML, CSS, Javascript, and your choce of a server-side language (one of PHP, .NET, Ruby on Rails, Perl and many others)

Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need to worry about processes and threads, they're not strictly related to web development. They're a software development concept. You have to stop, go back to W3Schools.com and learn the languages you see there. Forget about operating systems and processes and just learn to code.HTML, CSS, Javascript, and your choce of a server-side language (one of PHP, .NET, Ruby on Rails, Perl and many others)

Including js. I'm using node --for the finaslly time Ingolme...I got to find that jar-- I plan to learn php along with SQL too--since they are like partner in crime--.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't respond to the post earlier because you asked two questions and then immediately answered them yourself. If you don't understand those definitions then you need to ask specific questions about what you don't understand.If you want to see the processes running in Windows, press Ctrl-Shift-Esc, then click on the Processes tab. That lists all of the processes that are running (you can press the button at the bottom to view all users' processes, not just your own). In the View menu, you can choose Select Columns to choose what information you want to show about each process, including the number of threads.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't respond to the post earlier because you asked two questions and then immediately answered them yourself. If you don't understand those definitions then you need to ask specific questions about what you don't understand.If you want to see the processes running in Windows, press Ctrl-Shift-Esc, then click on the Processes tab. That lists all of the processes that are running (you can press the button at the bottom to view all users' processes, not just your own). In the View menu, you can choose Select Columns to choose what information you want to show about each process, including the number of threads.

... So process is the environment that the thread share and run in at any giving time. Right?Reading the definition, and understanding the concept is two different things. I understand what I read, but I need more to feel that understand-meant.
Link to post
Share on other sites

... So process is the environment that the thread share and run in at any giving time. Right?

That's generally correct.

I understand what I read, but I need more to feel that understand-meant.

That's why I'm saying you need to ask specific questions about what you don't understand. If you ask "what's a process" my response is going to be a dictionary definition. If you want something other than a dictionary definition then you need to ask for what you want.
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? Attack!!!!!!!!
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's why I'm saying you need to ask specific questions about what you don't understand. If you ask "what's a process" my response is going to be a dictionary definition. If you want something other than a dictionary definition then you need to ask for what you want.

Okay, thank you.
Link to post
Share on other sites

What do a database look like?!?!?Is it just a mvc which give me acess to an internal filesystem through a language or set of function?But it restrict me from touching the file in a GUI manner. I.G. drag to drop.I choose a XML database to program in xQuery, but also would like support for JSON. I wish to store my user information in JSON and website data in XML.I would like to understand the mechanism of a database.From what I have learn here, and of my own research, is that; It's as a terminal in a shell. I can manipulate the file through the input and see the result through the output. But with one big different. I can't touch the files with a mouse. I do not like that. I wish to be able to manipulate the file directly and indirectly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Databases don't look like anything. They are just collections of data. Different databases store data in one or more files which are generally organized for optimal retrieval and manipulation of the information within them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Databases don't look like anything. They are just collections of data. Different databases store data in one or more files which are generally organized for optimal retrieval and manipulation of the information within them.

I got to find that [em]jar![/em]So they are file, but I can't touch them... Right?On another note: processor lunching other processor is lunching the thread of that processor too.. Right?ECMAScript language is base on a one thread processor... Right?Having a call back function is not like having multilateral thread in that one processor... Right????So let say if one thread in a processor lunch another processor. Would that mean they'll be two processor, with two thread running asynchrony --not truly at the same time, but running at the same time-- ...right?Just think in your own server side programming language. Edited by L8V2L
Link to post
Share on other sites

So they are file, but I can't touch them... Right?

You can open them, edit them, delete them, do whatever you want to them, and in general you will have 100% success in corrupting all of the data in the database. The database management system is named that way for a reason - it manages the database. You won't achieve any form of additional understanding by trying to open one of the files in a hex editor and make sense of the binary data.

I wish to store my user information in JSON and website data in XML.

That's a bad idea. You store your information in whatever format the database supports. If it is a native XML database, then store the data in XML. If it is a relational database, then store the data in the relational schema. When you read the data and give it to your application to use them you can format it however you want, but if you store an entire user record as a JSON string then the only thing you have accomplished is that you have made none of that data searchable in the database. Again, it is a terrible idea to try and design an application when you have 0 experience writing applications.

On another note: processor lunching other processor is lunching the thread of that processor too.. Right?

Can you restate that in English? Lunching? Are you talking about a processor or a process? One of them is hardware, and one of them is software, and a processor does not have threads.

ECMAScript language is base on a one thread processor... Right?

ECMAScript is a single-threaded language, insofar as it does not have a way to create a new thread yourself. The browser executing the code definitely has multiple threads running various things. Right now my copy of Firefox has 52 threads in one process, and my copy of Opera has 32 processes (one for the main program, one for each tab open), with each process using between 7 and 40 threads.

Having a call back function is not like having multilateral thread in that one processor... Right?

A callback function in Javascript has nothing to do with a thread. There is still a single execution thread.

So let say if one thread in a processor lunch another processor.

I have no idea what that means.When you write a program, for example a C program, you can fork a new process. That creates a copy of the original process, and is tied to the original process. If the parent process ends, the child process will also end (I think, it's been a while since I've written C programs that fork). Both the parent and child can tell which one they are, and each has a copy of all of the same variables, but they don't share them. When the parent forks a new process then a copy of the parent process is made, and each of them start executing again at the same place (once the call to fork returns). They are both executing the same code, but with different copies of the variables and address space. They can tell which is which, so the parent can do one thing while the child can work on something else.http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2012/05/c-fork-function/
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You can open them, edit them, delete them, do whatever you want to them, and in general you will have 100% success in corrupting all of the data in the database. The database management system is named that way for a reason - it manages the database. You won't achieve any form of additional understanding by trying to open one of the files in a hex editor and make sense of the binary data.

Okay....

That's a bad idea. You store your information in whatever format the database supports. If it is a native XML database, then store the data in XML. If it is a relational database, then store the data in the relational schema. When you read the data and give it to your application to use them you can format it however you want, but if you store an entire user record as a JSON string then the only thing you have accomplished is that you have made none of that data searchable in the database. Again, it is a terrible idea to try and design an application when you have 0 experience writing applications.

There is xqueryiq for nevagating through JSON. And I believe exist-bd either have away to do such the same thing or to only concert the data to and from XML and JSON.

Can you restate that in English? Lunching? Are you talking about a processor or a process? One of them is hardware, and one of them is software, and a processor does not have threads.

I'm referring to process, sorry. I'm quoting this, so I can't see what I exactly type....Okay, so bassically what I'm asking here is --as it said in that article-- I can... Trigger a process with it's environment that of a copy of it's parent, and that'll be.... I'll just do more search for this one.

ECMAScript is a single-threaded language, insofar as it does not have a way to create a new thread yourself. The browser executing the code definitely has multiple threads running various things. Right now my copy of Firefox has 52 threads in one process, and my copy of Opera has 32 processes (one for the main program, one for each tab open), with each process using between 7 and 40 threads.

I'mma about to see about getting a new laptop... What would you prefer I get? Sadly it most be the cheapest... Or in the middle of price range. What would you consider?

A callback function in Javascript has nothing to do with a thread. There is still a single execution thread.I have no idea what that means.When you write a program, for example a C program, you can fork a new process. That creates a copy of the original process, and is tied to the original process. If the parent process ends, the child process will also end (I think, it's been a while since I've written C programs that fork). Both the parent and child can tell which one they are, and each has a copy of all of the same variables, but they don't share them. When the parent forks a new process then a copy of the parent process is made, and each of them start executing again at the same place (once the call to fork returns). They are both executing the same code, but with different copies of the variables and address space. They can tell which is which, so the parent can do one thing while the child can work on something else.

I can't wait to start learning C, C++, and objective-C!!!
Thanks for the link, I read the article, but not the other ones that this one link to.LOOK AT THIS: Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 134217728 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 3806 bytes) in /home/w3school/public_html/admin/sources/classes/text/parser.php on line 1808I have to cut it in half it seem.Nevermind, it was a syntax error. Edited by L8V2L
Link to post
Share on other sites

In computing, a process is an instance of a computer program that is being executed. It contains the program code and its current activity. Depending on the operating system (OS), a process may be made up of multiple threads of execution that execute instructions concurrently.In computer science, a thread of execution is the smallest sequence of programmed instructions that can be managed independently by a scheduler (typically as part of an operating system). The implementation of threads and processes differs from one operating system to another, but in most cases, a thread is a component of a process. Multiple threads can exist within the same process and share resources such as memory, while different processes do not share these resources. In particular, the threads of a process share the latter's instructions (its code) and its context (the values that its variables reference at any given moment).OHHHHHHHHHHHHH!So a process is an indivual environment--like a script... But different-- that contain threads--like code sinppit or call ack tuning at different times.. But different-- that runs at different times. Another process can be created to handle some of this processing of information --work--But what do they mean by:In particular, the threads of a process share the latter's instructions (its code) and its context (the values that its variables reference at any given moment).The word latter is hindering me from comprehending this part. I know the general mean/definition of the word --latter, speaking of the after in context; e.g. Would you like strawberry or blueberry? I'll like the latter --blueberry-- choose please-- <-- this is in my own words.

Edited by L8V2L
Link to post
Share on other sites

A process is a program running. Look at Firefox and Chrome as examples. You can verify what I'm about to tell you if you open the Windows Task Manager and look at the Processes tab like I mentioned before.Run Firefox. In the Processes tab, you'll see a process called firefox.exe start. I've had my copy running for a while, so right now I can see that it has 338MB of RAM allocated to it, it has a little over 15 minutes of CPU time (the amount of real time that the CPU has spent on that process since I've had it open), and it's using a little over 50 threads. The number of threads is changing, it's doing something in the background right now. So there is 1 Firefox process, with over 50 threads, using a total of around 338MB of memory. Right now my copy of Firefox has 5 tabs open, plus a Firebug window. All of these are part of the same process. If something goes wrong, for example maybe I go to a page and it has a Flash movie on it and there's a bug between Flash and Firefox and it causes a crash, that process will end, the Firefox window will close, all tabs will close, and the Firebug window will close. They are all part of the same process. Firefox might be using all of those threads to handle the individual tabs, or to run Javascript in the background, or to run the Flash movie, but if anything crashes the entire process gets killed.Now start Chrome. When I start Chrome fresh, I see 4 chrome.exe processes appear, and I'm just looking at Chrome's start page. There are 4 different processes for Chrome, each with between 7 and 31 threads. If I click to open a new tab in Chrome, it does not create another process but I do see the number of threads in one process go from 31 to 38 (7 new threads for the new tab). When I type a URL and press enter, like I go to google.com, it creates a 5th chrome.exe process for that new tab and the number of threads in the other process gradually goes back down to 31. The new process opened with 10 threads. Those threads for the tab might be handling things like sending HTTP requests, receiving server responses, parsing HTML, rendering the page, executing Javascript, displaying images, etc. Each thread is responsible for some part of having that tab open in the browser. Chrome separates each tab into its own process. That means that if I am on the page with a Flash bug and it causes a crash, only the process for that tab closes. That tab closes, but the other processes running the browser and the rest of the tabs stay up, so the entire browser doesn't crash like it would with Firefox with its 1 process for everything.Now, in Chrome, click the menu -> Tools -> Task Manager. A window pops up showing the 5 chrome.exe processes, and it has a description for each one. It also shows how much memory each one is using, percent of CPU, etc. The 5 processes are called Browser (the main Chrome application), "Tab: New Tab", which is the start page that I never closed, "Tab: Google", which is the tab I opened to go to google.com, "Extension: FirePHP4Chrome", so Chrome is running one of my extensions in its own process (if that extension crashes, it does not bring down the entire browser), and "GPU Process", which sounds like a process to have the GPU render the page using hardware instead of software.So, those are two different ways to use processes and threads. When I close Chrome I see 3 processes end immediately, and 2 others (probably the browser and either the extension or the GPU process) take a little longer to close. When a process closes it will give all of the memory that it has allocated back to the operating system, and once all of its resources are free then it stops running.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A process is a program running. Look at Firefox and Chrome as examples. You can verify what I'm about to tell you if you open the Windows Task Manager and look at the Processes tab like I mentioned before.Run Firefox. In the Processes tab, you'll see a process called firefox.exe start. I've had my copy running for a while, so right now I can see that it has 338MB of RAM allocated to it, it has a little over 15 minutes of CPU time (the amount of real time that the CPU has spent on that process since I've had it open), and it's using a little over 50 threads. The number of threads is changing, it's doing something in the background right now. So there is 1 Firefox process, with over 50 threads, using a total of around 338MB of memory. Right now my copy of Firefox has 5 tabs open, plus a Firebug window. All of these are part of the same process. If something goes wrong, for example maybe I go to a page and it has a Flash movie on it and there's a bug between Flash and Firefox and it causes a crash, that process will end, the Firefox window will close, all tabs will close, and the Firebug window will close. They are all part of the same process. Firefox might be using all of those threads to handle the individual tabs, or to run Javascript in the background, or to run the Flash movie, but if anything crashes the entire process gets killed.Now start Chrome. When I start Chrome fresh, I see 4 chrome.exe processes appear, and I'm just looking at Chrome's start page. There are 4 different processes for Chrome, each with between 7 and 31 threads. If I click to open a new tab in Chrome, it does not create another process but I do see the number of threads in one process go from 31 to 38 (7 new threads for the new tab). When I type a URL and press enter, like I go to google.com, it creates a 5th chrome.exe process for that new tab and the number of threads in the other process gradually goes back down to 31. The new process opened with 10 threads. Those threads for the tab might be handling things like sending HTTP requests, receiving server responses, parsing HTML, rendering the page, executing Javascript, displaying images, etc. Each thread is responsible for some part of having that tab open in the browser. Chrome separates each tab into its own process. That means that if I am on the page with a Flash bug and it causes a crash, only the process for that tab closes. That tab closes, but the other processes running the browser and the rest of the tabs stay up, so the entire browser doesn't crash like it would with Firefox with its 1 process for everything.Now, in Chrome, click the menu -> Tools -> Task Manager. A window pops up showing the 5 chrome.exe processes, and it has a description for each one. It also shows how much memory each one is using, percent of CPU, etc. The 5 processes are called Browser (the main Chrome application), "Tab: New Tab", which is the start page that I never closed, "Tab: Google", which is the tab I opened to go to google.com, "Extension: FirePHP4Chrome", so Chrome is running one of my extensions in its own process (if that extension crashes, it does not bring down the entire browser), and "GPU Process", which sounds like a process to have the GPU render the page using hardware instead of software.So, those are two different ways to use processes and threads. When I close Chrome I see 3 processes end immediately, and 2 others (probably the browser and either the extension or the GPU process) take a little longer to close. When a process closes it will give all of the memory that it has allocated back to the operating system, and once all of its resources are free then it stops running.

Oh.... I been using that as a maen of ending--terminate-- a browser --e.g. Firefox, ie, chrome-- when it start to get slow--I told you I need a new laptop, and ask for your recommendation-- I Internet explore use a lot of processs. And closing one don't close the other. So I'm guessing there is a process that affects all the other process but not vice verse. I'm guessing that process is the ie browser it self. So it is still a single processs with know awareness --unless program to-- of knowing about the other process, it's just a component, a peace of code of a large program which contain snippet of code, threads tuning in it--<= I did not word that last part right-- and all it is a ware of is probable the intensity of... work being done, but not the actually work to some degree. So when I wish to terminate all process and the browser as a hold I must go to that process by clicking left clock on the icon in the window that shows what's currently running --but not the OS or other components that is not an application on my screen to which I'm GUI interfacing with-- and click on the... Okay I women my laptop up from sleep mode, and as said I always have that window open. The screen that shows the GUI application which I or the os--due to setting-- have started is call ironically apllication. I just smile causing going through the steps that I go through to close the application via this means, and when left clicking on the icon that I wish to terminate, in this case Firefox. I go all the way down in the pop up window to... processs. To be more exact **Go To Provess*** --this remind me of your signature-- I click on it --as I did so many times in the pass-- and it bring me to the process Firefox.exe *32, I guess the *32 mean that's the main process to the browser it self . I open up ie, cause I remember when closing that it'll show multiple process, and not al of them had that *32 or none of them --refer to picture-- ... I don't know, all of them seem to have the *32... Like you said, you only had one for Firefox, so maybe Firefox only do one process for the internal browser... Anyway at the top on the label Tao I see; image name, user name, CPU, memory(private working set)--I'm guessing that's the threads--, and description. And at the top above that screen there are other tab to other... information giving screen --to which I have visited all in the past, but I did not understand them-- ...but as my eyes are a little more open to this. I can see familiarities in all of this. Those other tabs are... I'm just going to say all of them from left to right; apllications, processes, services, performance, networking, and users.I'm on performance and it showing me the system and the number of threads, and processes that is currently working and others things. I even see the Kendal in another area in performance.--again, still waiting on that recommendation on laptop--
Link to post
Share on other sites

I did chrome next, and it open up multiple process, than close 75 precent of them after a few second of starting chrome. It too, have --on all process-- chrome*32What's does *32 to mean?Okay than you, so a 32 bit application.What's the different between a 32 and 64 bit application?

Edited by L8V2L
Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the different between a 32 and 64 bit application?

Another 32 bits, obviously.It's the maximum instruction size that the processor can support. 64-bit processors have been mainstream for only a few years now, so there are still a lot of 32-bit applications. One of the ways it shows a difference is something like the size of an integer. In a 32-bit system, an integer is represented by 32 bits, so 232 is 4,294,967,296, over 4.2 billion. That means that an unsigned (always positive) integer can have any value from 0 to 4294967295 in a 32-bit system. A signed integer, where the first bit indicates positive or negative, can go from -2147483648 to 2147483648.With a 64-bit system, the maximum value for an unsigned integer is 18,446,744,073,709,551,616. The major place this has an impact is memory usage. Since a memory address is represented with a single integer, then the maximum addressable memory in a 32-bit machine is about 4GB of memory, the OS can't even refer to more memory than that. With a 64-bit system, where memory addresses are 64-bit integers, the OS can address much more memory, I think that represents 18 exabytes. We don't have mainstream computers that need exabytes of memory, so 64 bits will be fine for a while.Some supercomputers have processors that are larger, I think there are some with at least 80-bit architectures. Although today, instead of supercomputers having single large processors, the most powerful ones use many "normal" processors. The Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge lab, for example, has a combination of 18,688 AMD 16-core server CPUs, and 18,688 NVidia GPUs. All of those are 64-bit processors.
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...