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View Only PDF


paulgraphics
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Does anyone know if there is a way I display PDF documents to be viewed only. I want to give the user the ability to read the documents but not save them or be able to copy text from the document.Any help will be hugely appreciated.Paul

I know you can save it to be read only but im not sure about saving it :) You will need adobe acrobat (not just reader)Click File -> Document Properties -> SecurityYou will need to then password protect the documentPrinting Allowed = NoneChanges Allowed = NoneUncheck the box that enables copying.Here is a quick screenshot, i have put a red star at the checkbox which should be unchecked.12zf3.jpg
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Thanks for your quick response. However in the meantime I have been searching the big www and came across this quite interesting article which states that it doesn't matter what you do, once a document has been viewed in a browser it will automatically save the content in your 'Temporay Internet Files' folder on you local hard drive anyway...http://www.treasuresoftheweb.org/Treasured...RightClick.htmlA loose, loose situation by the looks of it!

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Thanks for your quick response. However in the meantime I have been searching the big www and came across this quite interesting article which states that it doesn't matter what you do, once a document has been viewed in a browser it will automatically save the content in your 'Temporay Internet Files' folder on you local hard drive anyway...http://www.treasuresoftheweb.org/Treasured...RightClick.htmlA loose, loose situation by the looks of it!

That's for a html webpage. I don't think a pdf will be saved there. :)
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All documents that the browser downloads and displays are stored locally, it doesn't matter what kind they are. In order for the browser to display something at all, it stores it locally. Browsers do not display files on a server. The browser downloads the file first, and then displays the local file. That is the case for all files, if you want someone to see something, it will be saved on their local machine before they even see it.

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All documents that the browser downloads and displays are stored locally, it doesn't matter what kind they are.  In order for the browser to display something at all, it stores it locally.  Browsers do not display files on a server.  The browser downloads the file first, and then displays the local file.  That is the case for all files, if you want someone to see something, it will be saved on their local machine before they even see it.
I agree with that.Say for example I go to a site and open up a pdf then leave the site and then look at my temporary internet files. There is no pdf document there but there are images/css etc from the same site.So do pdf's get saved elsewhere?Are pdf's less "temporary" than other files and get deleted straight after you close them?
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Honestly I'm not sure about that, that policy is up to the browser vendor and I'm not sure what the convention is. Opera, for example, will save everything I look at, I think by default inside My Documents. It goes for PDFs, Word docs, movies, anything. Right now I have 2 RTF documents I was testing online, and a PDF I was looking at a few weeks ago. Other browsers might choose to delete some things if you close them just to save space. It might also be a setting you can change. But the point I was getting across is that you really can't stop someone from saving anything that is online. The nature of being online prevents that, if you put something online then by definition it can be saved. HTTP, and TCP/IP especially, were developed as a way to move bytes from point A to point B, and that's really all they do. There is very little security native to the protocols, when they were being developed the developers just weren't concerned with security like that. I believe that native security is one of the major changes in IPv6. Even with embedded or streaming movies, it's easy enough to get the filename and download it directly.*I think that IE probably saves its files in \Documents and Settings\user\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files or somewhere under \Documents and Settings\user\Application Data

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Ok thanks for the info, i will check this out later when i have access to Opera, it must just be my current browser settings or something that does not save these file types :)

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