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DanV

Which One Will Prevail?

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If anyone can answer the following question then I feel those at this forum are qualified to do so.Is there one 'language' that will always be in use so let's say 5 to 10 years up the road it will still be effective?For example, let's say I wanted to learn all that there is to know - or at least as much as possible - about CSS and decided that I wanted to focus on just that and nothing else. Will CSS always be effective for the time scale mentioned above or will it fall into disuse thus necessitating learning something else?I know that HTML is the first of these and I can say that I know that along with CSS and some Java enough to get things done web-wise. Personally, I have nothing against learning new forms and improvements, etc. but I was wondering if there is one form that will always be in use, something indispensable that will always work regardless of variations to come.

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I feel that javascript will always be around, as there are not many alternatives to it. CSS has an alternative, and that is pure HTML tags. But all javascript has is JScript and VBscript. :)

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I believe XHTML and CSS are the two most likely languages to last like that. They will definetely be further added to and changed, but the basic syntax and rules will probably remain the same.

I feel that javascript will always be around, as there are not many alternatives to it. CSS has an alternative, and that is pure HTML tags. But all javascript has is JScript and VBscript. :)
Pure HTML-tags are an alternative now, but will it be in the future, say ten years as suggested? XHTML is already moving away from formatting attributes, and portability for different technologies (computer, cellphone, etc.) and user agents will be increasingly important. XHTML Strict is supposed to work for cell phones as well I think.

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CSS will eventually be replaced by XSL style sheets which format XML. But that does not mean its not a good idea to learn CSS because there are similarites between the two. I dont think its the language thats as important as understanding the concepts anyway.

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Thank you to all who have answered thus far on this.I guess that with Jonas' reply about XHTML and CSS I am at least on relatively stable ground - for at least a few years to come.As for AbstractApproach's "X86 Assembly", I will have to get back to him/her on that as soon as I make out what it is even though I went to a place where they were describing it. Whew.Now, ste says: "I dont think its the language thats as important as understanding the concepts anyway."I think that view applies to a lot of things, even those not computer related. It states that the languages will come and go but there will always be basics. It is precisely those basics that are at the center of my question, wondering if there was a language that no matter what came along it would still be relevant in the general sense.Again, I will continue with XHTML & CSS, it seems they will be around for some time at least.Now I'm going to go and read up on ste's mention of XSL.

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CSS will eventually be replaced by XSL style sheets which format XML. But that does not mean its not a good idea to learn CSS because there are similarites between the two. I dont think its the language thats as important as understanding the concepts anyway.
Aren't XSL stylesheets for converting XML into XHTML and CSS? How could they replace CSS?

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i was under the impression that it would, but on further reading you are correct aspnetguy. now im off to re-read the xml tutorials lol

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To abstractapproaches reply, we are talking about web languages. X86 assembly is for basic machines and such. You buy little chips and program them with assembly, I think assembly has about 30 functions and things you can do, thats it.

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Everything a computer does it does with assembly. Not assembly specifically, assembly gets broken down further to machine language, but assembly is the step between the machine language and a language like C or PHP. That reminds me of breadboards and the Goldwater engineering building.

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