Jump to content

Rewillis

Members
  • Content count

    11
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Rewillis

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. Subdomain.

    Attention: W3Schools Forum: I created a subdomain this morning ( named "bulletin.theholybible1.ga" ) for my Freenom.com domain name ( named "theholybible1.ga" ). This new web site is an example of a ".pdf" file embedded in a web site ( with a related article below it ). If you want to, type the subdomain in the address bar of your web browser and give me your honest ( see Colossians 3:9, for example ) assessment of it. If you want me to post the HTML 5 code for it, I can do that. Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for your consideration. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23.
  2. Inserting ".pdf" files.

    Attention: W3Schools Forum: Is there a way to insert ".pdf" files into these posts? Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for your help. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23.
  3. Looking for Direction

    Attention: THRobinson: Since you have an account on this web page, you might want to click on the "HTML Layout" link in the left-hand column. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23.
  4. HTML 5.

    Attention: David Sones: Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for finally clarifying your display name. I do not think that this forum is the proper place for a debate. I will officially ignore you through social media. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis
  5. HTML 5.

    Attention: DS*: What does your display name mean? Please tell me the facts. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23 P.P.S. - My previous response was based on the assumption that your display name was a cryptic form of "ThisOneSuck." I have had negative experiences with social media in the past, so I figured your display name was just another example of that. I do not freely use social media, but I have used this social media technical support site ( and another one for web hosting assistance ). If I was wrong about my assumption, then I will stand corrected on this issue ( see Proverbs 12:1, for example ). If you do not wish to provide me with any further assistance on this forum, then I will understand. Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for your help. Keep in touch.
  6. HTML 5.

    Attention: DS*: I originally thought your display name was an unusual foreign name, until I considered it further. Now I realize otherwise. I would just like to kindly suggest that you find a respectable display name ( see Romans 12:3, for example, and cf. 1 Thessalonians 5:22, for example ). I suppose I need to be corresponding with someone on this forum who has a respectable display name. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23.23.
  7. HTML 5.

    Attention: Dsonesuk: After just a few minutes of editing, I think I am close to a solution. If you will copy and paste the following code into a file ( named "<file_name>.htm" ) and type in "file:///<drive>:\<file_name>.htm" into the address bar of your browser, let me know what you think. The only quibble I have at this point in time is that the image and the text abuts the left and right outside borders. If I am not able to make this adjustment, I may just upload this code to my free web hosting site as is. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23. <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="UTF-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0"> <title>The Holy Bible.</title> <style> div.container { width: 100%; border: 1px solid gray; } header, footer { padding: 1em; color: white; background-color: purple; clear: left; text-align: center; } nav { float: left; max-width: 50%; margin: 0; padding: 0em; } nav ul { list-style-type: none; padding: 0; } nav ul a { text-decoration: none; } article { @media only screen and (max-width: 35%) { body { margin-left: 35%; border-left: 1px solid gray; padding: 1em; overflow: hidden; } } } </style> </head> <body> <div class="container"> <header> <h1>King James Version; 1611 Edition.</h1> </header> <nav> <ul> <img src="Holy_Bible_KJV_1611_EDITION_2_crop (640x632).jpg" style="max-width:97%"> </ul> </nav> <article> <p align="justify">When, with my parents, I was visiting the Albany Mall in Albany, Georgia, on Friday, October 30, 2009, I was perusing the shelves in the "Bibles" section of the Books-A-Million bookstore. As soon as I saw this version of the Holy Bible, I knew I had a find. I approached the cashier behind the counter, and asked her its price. I then purchased it. </p> <p align="justify">This particular copy is what Bible scholars call a "He" Bible because Ruth 3:15 reads as follows: "15 Also he said, Bring the &#8214 vaile that thou hast vpon thee, and holde it. And when she helde it, he measured sixe <i>measures</i> of barley, and laide it on her: and <ins>he</ins> went into the citie." There were also corresponding copies, in which the final phrase in verse fifteen reads ". . . <ins>she</ins> went into the citie." This discrepancy indicates that this version of the Holy Bible was produced by two presses. The word "she" was accepted as the correct rendering in later editions. [ See <i>The Bible Almanac</i>, Edited by: PACKER, JAMES I., A.M., D.Phil, TENNEY, MERRILL C., A.M., Ph.D., and WHITE, WILLIAM, JR., Th.M., Ph.D., THE OLD-TIME GOSPEL HOUR, LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA, Copyright &#169 1980 by Thomas Nelson Publishers, p. 77. ]</p> <p align="justify">On the page prior to page one, in this version of the Holy Bible, we find the line "A reprint of the edition of 1611," with the following line further down the page: "Third Printing Hendrickson Publisher's Edition &#8212 January 2008." The last line on this page reads "<i>Printed in the United States of America.</i>" Clearly, then, this copy is not an original print produced by the late Robert Barker, printer to the king's most excellent majesty, but a later reprint. <p align="justify">This version of the Holy Bible consists of eighty-one books ( the sixty-six canonical books, plus all fifteen of the Old Testament Apocyphal books ). Concerning the fact that the Old Testament Apocryphal books are not canonical, the following quotation is provided: ". . . . 3. Jesus and the New Testament writers never once quote the Apocrypha, although there are hundreds of quotes and references to almost all of the canonical books of the Old Testament. . . ." [ See <i>The NEW EVIDENCE THAT DEMANDS A VERDICT: Evidence I & II</i>, McDOWELL, JOSH, THOMAS NELSON PUBLISHERS, Nashville, Copyright &#169 1999 by Josh D. McDowell, p. 32. ] Please begin reading on page twenty-nine to get the immediate context. </p> <p align="justify">Roman numerals are employed to designate the chapter numbers of the books ( e.g., "CHAP. IIII" ), and in the upper margin, following the beginning of the book, to indicate the book number ( e.g., "I Corinthians," "II Corinthians," etc. ). Cross-references, and other notations, which are relatively sparse, are provided on the inside and outside margins of the page. On page thirty-nine ( in the Bibliographical Introduction ), under the heading "<i>The Rules to be observed in the Translation of the Bible</i>," the following two rules are found: (1) ". . . . 6. No Marginal Notes at all to be affixed, but only for the Explanation of the <i>Hebrew</i> or <i>Greek</i> Words, which cannot, without some circumlocution, so briefly and fitly be express'd in the Text. . . ." and (2) ". . . . 7. Such Quotations of Places to be marginally set down as shall serve for the fit Reference of one Scripture to another. . . ." </p> <p align="justify">Please study the Holy Bible ( which is God's word - see Psalm 119:65-73, 142, and 151; John 17:1, 3, and 17; Romans 15:1-4 ( especially verse 4, for example ); and 2 Timothy 2:15; 3:16, 17, for example ). God has commanded that the Scriptures be searched daily ( see Ecclesiastes 12:13 and Acts 17:11, for example ). Life on this earth is short ( see James 4:13, 14, for example ). </p> <br> <a href="https://rewillis1.joomla.com"target="_blank">Click here to visit my weblog.</a><br> <a href="mailto:rewillis1_1@juno.com">Click here to send me an e-mail message.</a> <br><br> Web page design by: Russell E. Willis. </p> </article> <footer>How I found this copy of this version of the Holy Bible.</footer> </div> </body> </html> P.P.S. - It appears to resize rather nicely.
  8. HTML 5.

    Attention: Dsonesuk: I changed the pixel values to percentages in two places, and have noticed a marked improvement, but the problem is not quite solved. When I click on the "Restore Down" button to minimize the size of my browser window, the vertical size appears to be okay ( if I remember correctly ), but the horizontal size appears to be fixed ( the right edge of the image overlaps the border between the left and right columns ). I have included the edited code below for your consideration. I have briefly reviewed the media query concept, and am thinking, at this point in time, that perhaps a percentage value will be needed there, as well. Maybe something like: @media only screen and (max-width: 40%) { body { <!-- I have to figure out what goes here. --> } } Any suggestions you may have would be helpful. Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for your help. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23. <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="UTF-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0"> <title>The Holy Bible.</title> <style> div.container { width: 100%; border: 1px solid gray; } header, footer { padding: 1em; color: white; background-color: purple; clear: left; text-align: center; } nav { float: left; max-width: 50%; margin: 0; padding: 0em; } nav ul { list-style-type: none; padding: 0; } nav ul a { text-decoration: none; } article { margin-left: 40%; border-left: 1px solid gray; padding: 1em; overflow: hidden; } </style> </head> <body> <div class="container"> <header> <h1>King James Version; 1611 Edition.</h1> </header> <nav> <ul> <img src="Holy_Bible_KJV_1611_EDITION_2_crop (640x632).jpg" style="width:616px;height:739px;"> </ul> </nav> <article> <p align="justify">When, with my parents, I was visiting the Albany Mall in Albany, Georgia, on Friday, October 30, 2009, I was perusing the shelves in the "Bibles" section of the Books-A-Million bookstore. As soon as I saw this version of the Holy Bible, I knew I had a find. I approached the cashier behind the counter, and asked her its price. I then purchased it. </p> <p align="justify">This particular copy is what Bible scholars call a "He" Bible because Ruth 3:15 reads as follows: "15 Also he said, Bring the &#8214 vaile that thou hast vpon thee, and holde it. And when she helde it, he measured sixe <i>measures</i> of barley, and laide it on her: and <ins>he</ins> went into the citie." There were also corresponding copies, in which the final phrase in verse fifteen reads ". . . <ins>she</ins> went into the citie." This discrepancy indicates that this version of the Holy Bible was produced by two presses. The word "she" was accepted as the correct rendering in later editions. [ See <i>The Bible Almanac</i>, Edited by: PACKER, JAMES I., A.M., D.Phil, TENNEY, MERRILL C., A.M., Ph.D., and WHITE, WILLIAM, JR., Th.M., Ph.D., THE OLD-TIME GOSPEL HOUR, LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA, Copyright &#169 1980 by Thomas Nelson Publishers, p. 77. ]</p> <p align="justify">On the page prior to page one, in this version of the Holy Bible, we find the line "A reprint of the edition of 1611," with the following line further down the page: "Third Printing Hendrickson Publisher's Edition &#8212 January 2008." The last line on this page reads "<i>Printed in the United States of America.</i>" Clearly, then, this copy is not an original print produced by the late Robert Barker, printer to the king's most excellent majesty, but a later reprint. <p align="justify">This version of the Holy Bible consists of eighty-one books ( the sixty-six canonical books, plus all fifteen of the Old Testament Apocyphal books ). Concerning the fact that the Old Testament Apocryphal books are not canonical, the following quotation is provided: ". . . . 3. Jesus and the New Testament writers never once quote the Apocrypha, although there are hundreds of quotes and references to almost all of the canonical books of the Old Testament. . . ." [ See <i>The NEW EVIDENCE THAT DEMANDS A VERDICT: Evidence I & II</i>, McDOWELL, JOSH, THOMAS NELSON PUBLISHERS, Nashville, Copyright &#169 1999 by Josh D. McDowell, p. 32. ] Please begin reading on page twenty-nine to get the immediate context. </p> <p align="justify">Roman numerals are employed to designate the chapter numbers of the books ( e.g., "CHAP. IIII" ), and in the upper margin, following the beginning of the book, to indicate the book number ( e.g., "I Corinthians," "II Corinthians," etc. ). Cross-references, and other notations, which are relatively sparse, are provided on the inside and outside margins of the page. On page thirty-nine ( in the Bibliographical Introduction ), under the heading "<i>The Rules to be observed in the Translation of the Bible</i>," the following two rules are found: (1) ". . . . 6. No Marginal Notes at all to be affixed, but only for the Explanation of the <i>Hebrew</i> or <i>Greek</i> Words, which cannot, without some circumlocution, so briefly and fitly be express'd in the Text. . . ." and (2) ". . . . 7. Such Quotations of Places to be marginally set down as shall serve for the fit Reference of one Scripture to another. . . ." </p> <p align="justify">Please study the Holy Bible ( which is God's word - see Psalm 119:65-73, 142, and 151; John 17:1, 3, and 17; Romans 15:1-4 ( especially verse 4, for example ); and 2 Timothy 2:15; 3:16, 17, for example ). God has commanded that the Scriptures be searched daily ( see Ecclesiastes 12:13 and Acts 17:11, for example ). Life on this earth is short ( see James 4:13, 14, for example ). </p> <br> <a href="https://rewillis1.joomla.com"target="_blank">Click here to visit my weblog.</a><br> <a href="mailto:rewillis1_1@juno.com">Click here to send me an e-mail message.</a> <br><br> Web page design by: Russell E. Willis. </p> </article> <footer>How I found this copy of this version of the Holy Bible.</footer> </div> </body> </html> P.P.S. - I may need to change the "style" attribute in the "<img>" tag, perhaps to "style = width:40%" or "style = max-width:40%."
  9. HTML 5.

    Attention: Davej: Yes, my web page is live online, the domain name is "theholybible1.ga ." The SynWrite editor reveals the HTML 5 code for my "index.htm" file. Your point regarding screen capture files seems to be mute, though, since I receive an error message that I am only allowed to upload 61.44kb ( and most of my screen capture files appear to be larger than that ). The "Restore Down" button is the one in the upper right-hand corner ( the middle symbol ) of the web browser ( with two squares in full-screen mode, and a single square in minimized mode ). As you suggested, I used the "Code" button ( "<>" ) to insert the code for my "index.htm" file, as shown below. I tried to copy and paste the original code from the Tryit Editor v3.5 ( the code for the example from which my html file was adapted ), but it would not work. The original code can be found at w3schools.com ( https://www.w3schools.com/html/html_layout.asp ). When I click on the "Restore Down" button to minimize the size of my web browser, the text in the right-hand column of my web page automatically resizes, but the image in the left-hand column does not, and my web page has an awkward appearance. The image tag ( "<img>" ), nested within the "<nav>" tag and the "<ul>" tag ( unordered list tag ), just above the "<article>" tag, is where the problem occurs. I have tried some other edits involving this section of code, but nothing has worked up to this point. Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for your help. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23. Davej: This is the HTML 5 code for my "index.htm" file: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="UTF-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0"> /* This line is the <meta> tag required for Responsive Web Design ( RWD ). */ <title>The Holy Bible.</title> <style> div.container { width: 100%; border: 1px solid gray; } header, footer { padding: 1em; color: white; background-color: purple; clear: left; text-align: center; } nav { float: left; max-width: 160px; margin: 0; padding: 0em; } nav ul { list-style-type: none; padding: 0; } nav ul a { text-decoration: none; } article { margin-left: 616px; border-left: 1px solid gray; padding: 1em; overflow: hidden; } </style> </head> <body> <div class="container"> <header> <h1>King James Version; 1611 Edition.</h1> </header> <nav> <ul> <img src="Holy_Bible_KJV_1611_EDITION_2_crop (640x632).jpg" style="width:616px;height:739px;"> </ul> </nav> <article> <p align="justify">When, with my parents, I was visiting the Albany Mall in Albany, Georgia, on Friday, October 30, 2009, I was perusing the shelves in the "Bibles" section of the Books-A-Million store. As soon as I saw this version of the Holy Bible, I knew I had a find. I approached the cashier behind the counter, and asked her its price. I then purchased it. </p> <p align="justify">This particular copy is what Bible scholars call a "He" Bible because Ruth 3:15 reads as follows: "15 Also he said, Bring the &#8214 vaile that thou hast vpon thee, and holde it. And when she helde it, he measured sixe <i>measures</i> of barley, and laide it on her: and <ins>he</ins> went into the citie." There were also corresponding copies, in which the final phrase in verse fifteen reads ". . . <ins>she</ins> went into the citie." This discrepancy indicates that this version of the Holy Bible was produced by two presses. The word "she" was accepted as the correct rendering in later editions. [ See <i>The Bible Almanac</i>, Edited by: PACKER, JAMES I., A.M., D.Phil, TENNEY, MERRILL C., A.M., Ph.D., and WHITE, WILLIAM, JR., Th.M., Ph.D., THE OLD-TIME GOSPEL HOUR, LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA, Copyright &#169 1980 by Thomas Nelson Publishers, p. 77. ]</p> <p align="justify">On the page prior to page one, in this version of the Holy Bible, we find the line "A reprint of the edition of 1611," with the following line further down the page: "Third Printing Hendrickson Publisher's Edition &#8212 January 2008." The last line on this page reads "<i>Printed in the United States of America.</i>" Clearly, then, this copy is not an original print produced by the late Robert Barker, printer to the king's most excellent majesty, but a later reprint. <p align="justify">This version of the Holy Bible consists of eighty-one books ( the sixty-six canonical books, plus all fifteen of the Old Testament Apocyphal books ). Concerning the fact that the Old Testament Apocryphal books are not canonical, the following quotation is provided: ". . . . 3. Jesus and the New Testament writers never once quote the Apocrypha, although there are hundreds of quotes and references to almost all of the canonical books of the Old Testament. . . ." [ See <i>The NEW EVIDENCE THAT DEMANDS A VERDICT: Evidence I & II</i>, McDOWELL, JOSH, THOMAS NELSON PUBLISHERS, Nashville, Copyright &#169 1999 by Josh D. McDowell, p. 32. ] Please begin reading on page twenty-nine to get the immediate context. </p> <p align="justify">Roman numerals are employed to designate the chapter numbers of the books ( e.g., "CHAP. IIII" ), and in the upper margin, following the beginning of the book, to indicate the book number ( e.g., "I Corinthians," "II Corinthians," etc. ). Cross-references, and other notations, which are relatively sparse, are provided on the inside and outside margins of the page. On page thirty-nine ( in the Bibliographical Introduction ), under the heading "<i>The Rules to be observed in the Translation of the Bible</i>," the following two rules are found: (1) ". . . . 6. No Marginal Notes at all to be affixed, but only for the Explanation of the <i>Hebrew</i> or <i>Greek</i> Words, which cannot, without some circumlocution, so briefly and fitly be express'd in the Text. . . ." and (2) ". . . . 7. Such Quotations of Places to be marginally set down as shall serve for the fit Reference of one Scripture to another. . . ." </p> <p align="justify">Please study the Holy Bible ( which is God's word - see Psalm 119:65-73, 142, and 151; John 17:1, 3, and 17; Romans 15:1-4 ( especially verse 4, for example ); and 2 Timothy 2:15; 3:16, 17, for example ). God has commanded that the Scriptures be searched daily ( see Ecclesiastes 12:13 and Acts 17:11, for example ). Life on this earth is short ( see James 4:13, 14, for example ). </p> <br> <a href="https://rewillis1.joomla.com"target="_blank">Click here to visit my weblog.</a><br> <a href="mailto:rewillis1_1@juno.com">Click here to send me an e-mail message.</a> <br><br> Web page design by: Russell E. Willis. </p> </article> <footer>How I found this copy of this version of the Holy Bible.</footer> </div> </body> </html> I have also adapted the following code ( found at https://www.w3schools.com/html/html_responsive.asp ): <img src="img_girl.jpg" style="width:100%;"> for my "index.htm" file, which is: <img src="The_Holy_Bible_KJV_1611_EDITION_2_crop (640x632).jpg" style="width:100%;"> But this line of HTML 5 code does not solve my problem. I am trying to get the image to fill the left-hand column of my web page regardless of whether the web browser is in full-screen mode or minimized mode.
  10. HTML 5.

    Attention: W3Schools Forum members: Since I do not seem to be allowed to post any addition screen capture files at this time, maybe I can do so in response to someone's reply to my previous posting. Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for your help. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23.
  11. HTML 5.

    Attention: W3Schools Forum members: I have created a small SynWrite ( version 6.40.2770, if I remember correctly ) project file ( named "The_Holy_Bible_1.synw-proj" ), which contains a small HTML 5 file ( named "index.htm" ) and a small ".jpg" file ( named "Holy_Bible_KJV_1611_EDITION_2_CROP (640x632).jpg" ). My html file is is adapted from an example html file from the website ( named "www.w3schools.com" ). I have included the proper "meta" tag ( <meta> ) near the top of my html file, in order to enable Responsive Web Design ( RWD ). My web site ( named "The Holy Bible" ) appears fine ( for the most part ) in full screen mode in the Chrome web browser, for example. However, when I click on the "Restore Down" button in my web browser, the image on the left side of the web page does not fill that portion of the web page. Furthermore, when I edit the "image" tag ( "<img>" ) in my html file, to enable responsive web design for my image, the image actually shrinks in size when I view it in the Chrome web browser locally ( by typing in "file:///j:\index.htm" in the address bar of my browser ). I have included the screen capture files in this posting for your consideration. Do you have any suggestions? I have edited the html code in various ways, but nothing seems to work for my image size, so that it resizes to fill the left side of my web page. Thank you ( see Colossians 3:15, for example ) for your help. Keep in touch. Sincerely in Christ, Russell E. Willis P.S. - Please read Proverbs 23:23. P.P.S. - I will have to post the remaining screen capture files in additional posts, since there is a limit to the number of files to include per posting.
×