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Help A Noob: Html + Css + Flash = Ie8 Problem.


Ari Ace
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Hello W3.After trying to search for a solution for my problem and not having any success I have decided to post a new topic on this matter in hopes that someone here can help me solve it. I am currently working on a website containing a piece of Flash, witch I have managed to embed using your tutorial and I positioned it on my desired spot using style. This works very well in Firefox but when I open it in Internet Explorer the Flash is no longer on the right spot, tho it isn't top left either. It just kinda hangs out on it's own random spot. I don't know if it is something I did or if it is one of those IE things that just don't work but I really need someone to explain to me why this is behaving the way it is. Thank you.This is the code I'm using:

<body><object width="208" height="297" style="position:absolute;top:243px;left:15px;"><param name="navigation1_swe" value="layout/navigation1_swe.swf"><embed src="layout/navigation1_swe.swf" width="208" height="297" style="position:absolute;top:243px;left:15px;"></embed></object></body>

Edited by Ari Ace
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Having that DOCTYPE forces the page into standards compliance mode, so things are rendered more consistently.

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Right... lets pretend I got that. :) But no seriously, it is a template for behavior of a site then? I've checked this out with the "validator" and everything but kinda figured I wouldn't need it, now it seems a bit more important then I thought. Thing is, I work on my stuff off line and that kinda makes me guess what DOCTYPE to use for different things unless I ask people off course. :)

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HTML pages are written in SGML (and XHTML pages in XML), which is a very general format for markup languages. A DTD (referenced through the DOCTYPE declaration) tells the user agent what exactly the particular markup language of the page (e.g. HTML) is made up of, that is what elements, attributes, etc. it has.If you page is valid, it means it follows the rules of the DTD you have assigned.Many browsers have two modes - a "quirks" mode and a "standards compliant" mode. The quirks mode is for rendering older pages, while standards compliance is for newer ones. A new DOCTYPE will invoke standards compliant mode, while an older or more transitional one will cause the browser to fall back into quirks mode.

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Basically a DTD (which stands for Document Type Definition) sets up an expectation for the webpage to follow, and as such forces the browser to render page elements according to the rules of that DTD (with a strict DTD arguably being the recommended type). This ensures a higher degree of compatibility across browsers (assuming that they render to the standards of the DTD). Luckily, most modern day browsers (with IE being the notable exception) follow the rules of the W3's DTD's, and thus provides for a better and more consistent developing and viewing environment, for both developers and users. Essentially, it allows us all to be on the same page, and limits surprises or "quirks", which is what you get when you declare no DTD and leave it up to the browser to decide how to render the page elements.

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