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Php In Page That Is Opened With Javascript


son
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I have on one page a link that opens a pop up window to display file on server in nice format (it simply opens file with certain height and width). The link is as:<a href="page-1.php?lang=<?php echo $page_lang;?>" target="_blank" onClick="return popup(this, 'photoPage')">In link I pass on now a language option which should display the relevant 'Close window' link in correct language. The code for this is:

if ($lang == 'en'){?><script type="text/javascript">document.write("<input type=\"button\" onclick=\"window.close()\" value=\"Close window\" />");</SCRIPT><?php}else{?><script type="text/javascript">document.write("<input type=\"button\" onclick=\"window.close()\" value=\"Fermer la fenĂȘtre\" />");</SCRIPT><?php}?>

It simply displays an empty page. Do not get this. Is it not possible to use PHP in page that is opened with Javascript?Son

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It depends on what your popup() function does. If you are just clicking the link, the page will open like any page and be processed by PHP in the normal way.Why doesn't your PHP script output an entire HTML document? Outputting just a script could be a problem in some browsers. I'm not sure. And why output a script that uses document.write? Why not write the button in HTML, or have PHP echo the HTML for the button?

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It depends on what your popup() function does. If you are just clicking the link, the page will open like any page and be processed by PHP in the normal way.Why doesn't your PHP script output an entire HTML document? Outputting just a script could be a problem in some browsers. I'm not sure. And why output a script that uses document.write? Why not write the button in HTML, or have PHP echo the HTML for the button?
I thought that you can only use JavaScript to produce a 'Close window' button? The complete popup script is:
function popup(mylink, windowname){if (! window.focus)return true;var href;if (typeof(mylink) == 'string')   href=mylink;else   href=mylink.href;window.open(href, windowname, 'width=860,height=760,scrollbars=no');return false;}function popup2(mylink, windowname){if (! window.focus)return true;var href;if (typeof(mylink) == 'string')   href=mylink;else   href=mylink.href;window.open(href, windowname, 'width=520,height=740,scrollbars=no');return false;}

Son

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The popup functions look fine. So does your PHP. And when I loaded one of your scripts into a window, even without a complete document, it created a button.So I think the problem is somewhere else in page-1.phpJust to be clear: you do not need javascript to create a button of any kind. You do need javascript to execute window.open()

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The popup functions look fine. So does your PHP. And when I loaded one of your scripts into a window, even without a complete document, it created a button.So I think the problem is somewhere else in page-1.phpJust to be clear: you do not need javascript to create a button of any kind. You do need javascript to execute window.open()
I could not make my code working and changed it to:
if ($lang == 'en'){echo '<script type="text/javascript">';echo 'document.write("<input type=\"button\" onclick=\"window.close()\" value=\"Close window\" />")';echo '</SCRIPT>';}elseif ...

which works now.Thanks for your feedback. Still do not get it how a html button can close a window. Could you give me a quick sample code. Maybe then I understand what you mean...Son

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I think I understand your problem now. You kept talking about empty windows and buttons. That is not your issue, I think. It doesn't matter what makes the button. The issue is when are you allowed to close a window using javascript.A script may close a window that only if it opened that window. If Window A opens Window B, then Window A may also close Window B. But Window A cannot close itself, and Window B cannot close itself.This is because a window is not the same as a document. You own your own documents. But you only own a window if your document opened it. Otherwise, the user retains control of the window.A user would be unhappy if he surfed to a page and the window closed itself. All the window's history would be gone, and any state that existed in forms in previous pages would be lost, and so on.

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We must be in different universes. I put this element in an empty document:<input type="button" onclick="window.close()" value="close me">click it, and the window does not close. FF3.57 and 3.6 throw an error. Safari and Chrome do nothing.From the HTML 5 specification:

The close() method on Window objects should, if the corresponding browsing context A is an auxiliary browsing context that was created by a script (as opposed to by an action of the user), and if the browsing context of the script that invokes the method is allowed to navigate the browsing context A, close the browsing context A (and may discard it too).
The key words here: "auxiliary browsing context that was created by a script (as opposed to by an action of the user)"Meaning: your script can close a window only if the script opened the window. If your user opened it, no dice.Maybe older browsers still allow it. I don't know. Also, I'm on a Mac. Usually the development teams are at the same place, but I suppose there could be small discrepancies.But make no mistake. This restriction is the future, and browsers are moving there now.
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I have a script on PageA which opens PageB in a new window. I submit a form from PageB which takes me to PageC (same window as PageB). There is a script in PageC that closes the window.This works, though I'm not sure if that would count as being the same script. Perhaps it is?

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I just tried something similar and it also works as you report. Because your last window is ultimately a product of the first script, I think it meets the definition of "auxiliary browsing context" -- that is, your scripts opened it, so your scripts own it. You can close what you own, but not what you don't own.It would be different if your user got to that third page by entering the URI in the address bar. Same document, but a different browsing context.In a case like that, the user opened the window, so the user owns the window. It might be the 100th document to open in that window. It would be totally wrong for a script in document 100 to erase the history and state of 99 other documents.Maybe what is surprising is how much information a browser actually tracks. It's a lot.

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I just tried something similar and it also works as you report. Because your last window is ultimately a product of the first script, I think it meets the definition of "auxiliary browsing context" -- that is, your scripts opened it, so your scripts own it. You can close what you own, but not what you don't own.It would be different if your user got to that third page by entering the URI in the address bar. Same document, but a different browsing context.In a case like that, the user opened the window, so the user owns the window. It might be the 100th document to open in that window. It would be totally wrong for a script in document 100 to erase the history and state of 99 other documents.Maybe what is surprising is how much information a browser actually tracks. It's a lot.
In my case it is ulitmately the user's choice if he presses the button, so I should see no issues with this (it is also working now...)...Son
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