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Guest Maurizio
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HTML will only ever change the way an image is presented - it doesn't change the physical properties of image it self.If ie.gif is 15 pixels by 15 pixels then<img src="http://www.w3schools.com/images/ie.gif">will'>http://www.w3schools.com/images/ie.gif">will present it that way just like this will too:<img src="http://www.w3schools.com/images/ie.gif" width="15" height="15">this:<img src="http://www.w3schools.com/images/ie.gif" width="35" height="35">will present the same image larger, it doesn't change physical nature of the file - HTML simply doesn't do that.Moving on, increasing the size of an image can only be done with the appropriate software, like Adobe Photoshop. It has the ability to manipulate the size of an image. However, you have to understand that you cannot make something that is small bigger and expect to gain quality - its scientifically impossible. Think of it like the bubble gum you chew. Take it out of your mouth and make it bigger - it stretches and eventually thins out - it simply doesn't have enough mass to accommodate the change you are putting it through. Images(files) are the same way, there isn't enough information in a 15x15 ie.gif file that is 178kb to be stretched larger - there just isn't enough information.On the contrary, take that same piece of gum and squish it to a smaller piece. You still have a larger mass and you still retain everything you had from the beginning, just in a smaller area. It will look a little different, but there is still plenty of information there to see what it is.All in all, you will not be able to "zoom in" or make a smaller image larger without loosing quality.Hope that helps.

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However, you have to understand that you cannot make something that is small bigger and expect to gain quality
There's a caveat there, that only applies to raster or bitmap images. Raster or bitmap images are formats like GIF, JPEG, PNG, etc, where the image is essentially stored as a grid of pixels where each pixel has a certain color. Vector images are images where, instead of storing pixel information, you store information about shapes. So if you had a line in an image, instead of saving color information for that line in the appropriate pixels, the image just says "draw a line from [x,y] to [x,y] and color it red" or whatever. That way you can zoom in or out as much as you want and all of the lines will remain sharp.To see an example, find any Flash movie online, such as this one. Flash movies are saved in a vector format. You can right-click on the movie and click Zoom In to zoom, and when you do notice that the lines don't get blurry, they just get bigger. You can zoom in on something like the tank and still see sharp lines, even though you might be too far zoomed to see what you're looking at.
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justsomeguy, thanks for pointing that out. I didn't want to over complicate the idea by introducing vector based work. Nonetheless it is indeed a caveat I failed to mention.Thanks for adding that in.

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