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Managing Web Servers: Unix

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#1 protechig

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 01:47 AM

I am kind of new to the whole server admin side of the web. I just learned UNIX through a very handy video, and I can definitely see it's advantages. The video showed ma a lot as far as working in the command line, and different things that I can do. What it did not show me was how to manage a web server remotely through unix. I know it is possible, through SSH (I slightly understand how it works). My eventual goal is to just purchase(or rent) my own web server running ubuntu(or whatever flavor of unix) and be able to completely manage it through no UI.

I'm interested in learning things about creating/managing MySQL database, how to link to the database, any relevant things with PHP, and how to assign domain names, like the name servers and things like that. How to create a subdomain, and how do host multiple sites off the server.

I know that this could prove to be an advanced topic, but I think it is something that I need to learn to be successful, and more efficient. I would appreciate any guidance as I am novice as far as this goes.

Thanks,
Zach

#2 justsomeguy

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 05:21 PM

Each one of those is a separate advanced topic. Managing servers is a full-time career job, there are entire college programs which teach various aspects of web and database servers. There are even people who only manage database servers, or only manage web servers, or domain controllers, etc. Even deeper, there are people who only work with MySQL, or Oracle, or MSSQL. Each of those can be considered a full-time job. My advice would be to take things one step at a time and figure out what you really want to do. If you want to be able to do everything involved with running a server, including securing all of the various pieces, then you're looking at several years of experience hopefully backed up with academic study in a degree program.
Know your history: Babbage | Lovelace | Turing | Hopper | Ritchie
ConTEXT Sublime Text Opera PHP MySQL phpMyAdmin
Use a debugger: Firefox, IE, Chrome, Safari, or Opera
Know the foundations of computer science: algorithms, machine architectures, data structures, etc. Don't just blindly copy techniques from application to application. Know what you are doing, that it works, and why it works. Don't think you know what the industry will be in five years time or what you'll be doing then, so gather a portfolio of general and useful skills. Try to write better, more principled code. Work to make "programming" more of a professional activity and less of a low-level "hacking" activity (programming is also a craft, but not just a craft). Learn from the classics in the field and the better advanced textbooks; don't be satisfied with the easily digested "how to" guides and online documentation - it's shallow.
-- Bjarne Stroustrup

He that teaches himself has a fool for a master.
-- Benjamin Franklin (paraphrased)

#3 crony

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 08:27 AM

Hi, men.
At first, excuse my English, please.
I have zero knowlege of computer, and just therefore (possibly), I have stupid self-confidence.
There was a desire to do a little site about boating. Once on your site and viewing, it briefly, I realized that this is possible. But there are questions related to the deployment site and for ISPs. I want to place it on a dedicated server. Please do not try to dissuade me from this. I heard enough of this at the local sites, in addition, there is talk in jargon that is impossible to understand. I plan to use the cheapest server within 3-4 months, for self-study, and then perhaps move on to the virtual. To do this, I want to simulate a dedicated server on the second drive of my computer, and using ssh and Linuxe.

Can your forum helps me with this?
If your answer - Yes, I shall ask.

I want to warn you that before I used Windows, I get knowledge from Wikipedia, and your site, communicate quickly I can not, but I should be reading everything very carefully
Thank you.
P.S. protechig excuse me that I post to your topic. After answer of moderators to my post I ask its to remove .

#4 TheGallery

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 10:09 AM

...communicate quickly I can not...


Are you....yoda? :|

#5 justsomeguy

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 03:37 PM

There may be people who can help you figure out how to set up a web server. The first step is to install Apache or whatever web server your dedicated server will eventually use. Try to figure out what software the server you will get will have on it, and install the same stuff on your own computer.
Know your history: Babbage | Lovelace | Turing | Hopper | Ritchie
ConTEXT Sublime Text Opera PHP MySQL phpMyAdmin
Use a debugger: Firefox, IE, Chrome, Safari, or Opera
Know the foundations of computer science: algorithms, machine architectures, data structures, etc. Don't just blindly copy techniques from application to application. Know what you are doing, that it works, and why it works. Don't think you know what the industry will be in five years time or what you'll be doing then, so gather a portfolio of general and useful skills. Try to write better, more principled code. Work to make "programming" more of a professional activity and less of a low-level "hacking" activity (programming is also a craft, but not just a craft). Learn from the classics in the field and the better advanced textbooks; don't be satisfied with the easily digested "how to" guides and online documentation - it's shallow.
-- Bjarne Stroustrup

He that teaches himself has a fool for a master.
-- Benjamin Franklin (paraphrased)

#6 davej

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 11:47 PM

Some people create their own home web server, but I think you need a good internet connection -- not just DSL or Cable which generally forbid hosting. As a first step I would think that the easiest way to learn about creating a website would be to go to a hosting provider and pay them a hosting subscription. They will then provide the hosting and you just build your website. You might want to search the message threads on forums such as http://www.webhostingtalk.com/ for suggestions. The PHP, HTML, CSS, and database creation will be your job. The hosting provider will provide the remote server running Apache or IIS and can probably sell you a domain name (although some people strongly advise against buying a domain name from your hosting provider).

Edited by davej, 21 December 2011 - 11:50 PM.

This concludes this test of our sanity -- you may now return to your regular programming.

#7 crony

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 08:18 AM

Good day!
TheGallery - What is yoda? My first post been compiled within 2 hours, you understand?, I hope.

davej - "DSL or Cable which generally forbid hosting"- thanks for warn, I do not knew. I, of course, take into account your comments. But to go to the ISP, I need to know at least something, so I need a second drive.

justsomeguy - Hoster has:
AMD Athlon 64 3700+
* RAM 1024 MB DDR400 RAM
* Hard disks 2x 160 GB SATA HDD
(Software-RAID 1)
NIC 100 MBit
Software:
Operating System
* 32-Bit:
Debian 6.0 min, CentOS 5.7 min, CentOS 6.0 min
* 64-Bit:
Debian 6.0 min/LAMP*, CentOS 5.7 min, CentOS 6.0 min
-there are and other.
Operating System via VNCVirtual Network Computing, VNC, enables operating system installation directly via the admin interface Robot. openSuSE 12.1, Fedora 16, CentOS 6.0
Administration (available for LAMP) Webmin
*Linux *Apache *MySQL *PHP
Service:
Dedicated IP 1
(allocation in accordance with RIPE guidelines)
Reverse DNS Administration
....- and others.

I have: Р4-1,8Ггц, second disk will SATA 80GB, I do not know what doing with second disk, for how many of partitions to divide? ( I wish 4 ). If I divide the disk to four partitions, install Debian-6 and CentOS-6, and leave 2 partitions empty, this can for begining?

Thanks, men.

#8 justsomeguy

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 06:10 PM

You can divide it into partitions if you want to, but the server you get is only going to have one operating system. That list gives you choices for which one you want, but there's only going to be one installed. So pick the Linux distro you want to work with, install that, and then set up Apache, MySQL, and PHP and go from there. It looks like they also include the Webmin control panel, so you'll probably want to install that also since you'll be using it to manage your hosted server.
Know your history: Babbage | Lovelace | Turing | Hopper | Ritchie
ConTEXT Sublime Text Opera PHP MySQL phpMyAdmin
Use a debugger: Firefox, IE, Chrome, Safari, or Opera
Know the foundations of computer science: algorithms, machine architectures, data structures, etc. Don't just blindly copy techniques from application to application. Know what you are doing, that it works, and why it works. Don't think you know what the industry will be in five years time or what you'll be doing then, so gather a portfolio of general and useful skills. Try to write better, more principled code. Work to make "programming" more of a professional activity and less of a low-level "hacking" activity (programming is also a craft, but not just a craft). Learn from the classics in the field and the better advanced textbooks; don't be satisfied with the easily digested "how to" guides and online documentation - it's shallow.
-- Bjarne Stroustrup

He that teaches himself has a fool for a master.
-- Benjamin Franklin (paraphrased)

#9 crony

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 06:32 PM

Good day.
justsomeguy -For my computer need only 32-bit OSs?
Two weeks ago I set the gNewSense(Debian-family)side by side to Windows. All had went smoothly and clarity, except end, where been choice between a few kinds initial booting of OSs. I did foggy fo me the acts, but all ended well.
To avoid foggy fo me acts, I want switch off 'HomeDisk' at all, and install Linux to 'ServerDisk' from CD, and after to put *Apache *MySQL *PHP and so on.
Shutdown computer,plug in 'HomeDisk', power on computer, pick from BIOS the 'HomeDisk', to boot gNewSense.
I hope see content 'ServerDisk' in File Brouser my gNewSense.
Can I do that way? There are others ways but I afraid errors.
Thanks.

#10 davej

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 06:25 PM

My poor language skills are making this conversation difficult for me to follow. It sounds like you are saying you have two hard drives in the computer and you want to remove Linux from the HD it is now installed on and then install it on the other HD. This should be possible and should be available from the menus of the install CD if you set the BIOS boot order to start the CD before the HDs. The Linux boot sector may need to remain on whichever HD is the primary boot disk but I would think that it would allow all the other sectors to be placed on the secondary HD. Create an "Extended Partition" on the secondary HD and then create Logical Partitions for each of the standard Linux directories; /var /usr /tmp /home etc... You might also consider a product like the following to give you a little more flexibility;

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817997016

Also regarding the internet connection you will need -- the obvious thing is that you will need to obtain an internet connection with a "Fixed IP Address" from your ISP.

You may be getting in way over your head if you are going to be learning Linux and Apache and PHP and HTML and CSS all at the same time.
This concludes this test of our sanity -- you may now return to your regular programming.

#11 crony

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 10:39 PM

Hi all.
davej- it is attempt to clarify my previous post. My goal is simulate into new second HD the dedicated server, I named this HD-'ServerDisk'. I already have HD with Linux(gNewSense), I named this disk-'HomeDisk'. I will not do anything with this disk('HomeDisk'), I just turn it off while I will be setting Linux to 'ServerDisk'. After I had installed Linux to 'ServerDisk' from CD, and after to put *Apache *MySQL *PHP and so on. After all I Shutdown computer,plug in 'HomeDisk', power on computer, pick from BIOS the 'HomeDisk', to boot gNewSense.
I hope see content 'ServerDisk' in File Brouser my gNewSense.
Can I do that way? There are others ways but I afraid errors.
Thanks
P.S. Excuse me if I wrote it is unclear again, please.

#12 davej

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 11:07 PM

Linux can certainly see all the HD's in the system, but I'm not sure the non-boot HD's will always auto-mount. What is the purpose of HomeDisk?
This concludes this test of our sanity -- you may now return to your regular programming.

#13 crony

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 11:37 PM

hope that the BIOS determine the both disks, but I will booted from 'HomeDisk', and I will see 'ServerDisk' as dedicated server, but I am not shure.

#14 davej

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 12:42 AM

hope that the BIOS determine the both disks, but I will booted from 'HomeDisk', and I will see 'ServerDisk' as dedicated server, but I am not shure.


The BIOS will certainly see both disks, but what do you want to do with them? The GRUB menu allows you to select the desired OS, not the desired HD. For Linux setup questions you might as well go and talk with experienced people;

http://www.linuxques...linux-newbie-8/
or
http://www.linuxforu...g/forum/newbie/

Edited by davej, 26 December 2011 - 12:46 AM.

This concludes this test of our sanity -- you may now return to your regular programming.

#15 crony

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 01:44 PM

Good day.
davej- GRUB throws me in a holy terror! With my actions, I want to avoid many difficulties. In the end, I hope to have two boot options from the BIOS: 1) 'HomeDisk'- and I work with 'ServerDisk' as dedicated server,
2)'ServerDisk'- and I work as a normal OS.
Thanks.

Edited by crony, 26 December 2011 - 02:19 PM.


#16 davej

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 04:43 PM

In the end, I hope to have two boot options from the BIOS: 1) 'HomeDisk'- and I work with 'ServerDisk' as dedicated server,
2)'ServerDisk'- and I work as a normal OS.


The only way to completely isolate two disks is to use a disk bay (see link above). Will you use Linux for the HomeDisk or will you use Windows? If you use two different OS's then the GRUB menu will let you choose the OS, but this does not isolate one disk from the other. On my dual-boot disks I use ext3 format for Linux and NTFS for Windows. This provides a slight isolation since Windows cannot read the ext3 disk partitions.

If you use Linux for both Home and Server then there are other possible options, such as GRUB launching different runlevels, so that the Home mode would run the desktop GUI desktop but the Server would run only a command line. For this and other details you should probably talk to more experienced Linux people.

Edited by davej, 26 December 2011 - 04:51 PM.

This concludes this test of our sanity -- you may now return to your regular programming.

#17 crony

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 06:28 PM

I, of course, shall be using Linux from 'HomeDisk' for a communicate with 'ServerDisk' ( Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP and so on are here).
No the task completely to isolate the disks. Task is send commands from 'HomtDisk' to 'ServerDisk' via terminal, i.e. command line.

#18 davej

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 06:33 PM

I, of course, shall be using Linux from 'HomeDisk' for a communicate with 'ServerDisk' ( Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP and so on are here).
No the task completely to isolate the disks. Task is send commands from 'HomtDisk' to 'ServerDisk' via terminal, i.e. command line.


I would think that the only way to run the two disks at the same time and completely isolated would be to use two different PC's or to perhaps use a Virtual Machine -- but I don't know enough about VM's to tell you what they can do.

Edit--

Perhaps you should re-evaluate whether you want to create a home server or simply buy space at a web hosting company. With a hosting service it is as you describe -- You write your web code on your home pc and then you connect with their server via FTP and upload your code to create and maintain your website. The hosting company server is completely isolated from your home pc and is many miles away. Normally you share a server with a number of other customers (who are all isolated -- this is done transparently to you) or you can pay higher rent per month and get a dedicated server. Google "Web Hosting Service." An example would be http://www.hostmonster.com/

Edited by davej, 27 December 2011 - 04:22 PM.

This concludes this test of our sanity -- you may now return to your regular programming.





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