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Error found in guide


electrovirr
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I would just like to bring to attention an error that I found on the w3schools HTML guide. I would also like to bring to attention that I find it really annoying that I had to sign up for the forum and get approval, just to report a one word error. I'm probably never going to use this forum again. (Unless I find another error and haven't found a better way to report them by then.) If there is some way that I can report errors (the right way) please bring it to my attention, because the w3schools website did not...On the "HTML Forms and Input" page of the HTML guide, near the bottom of the page before the "more examples" there is the coding for a submit button that is WRONG. I uploaded an image with the error highlighted. The highlighted word should beButtonnotsubmitThank you for your wonderful guide w3schools! I hope this helps.

post-23172-1215823379_thumb.png

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Better still, use the slightly more modern <button type="submit">I'm a submit button!</button>Nevertheless, Natechs is correct. An <input type="submit"> is interpreted as a button, specifically a submit button, that is, clicking it submits the form without your having to write additional code.Tip: if you're going to shoot at kings, don't miss.

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I'm probably never going to use this forum again.
I can't say I am dissappointed. You come in here ranting just to report some error which is in fact NOT an error. You couls have used the first link on the top right that says About W3schools that would have shown you this http://www.w3schools.com/about/about_helping.asp which has a nice section called "Help Us Correct Errors and Broken Links" that has an email address to report errors.Sorry but all you've done is embarrass yourself.
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<html><body><form name="input" action="html_form_action.asp"method="get">Username: <input type="text" name="user"><input type="submit" value="Submit"></form></body></html>Exactly what it says. I think i did this on my PC (which sucks) and for whatever reason it messed it up.Now, trying it again on my Mac, it works. I can't try it on my PC again cause it's um... trashed.

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Guest FirefoxRocks

Make sure that you have a page called html_form_action.asp running on an ASP server in order for something to submit.Or are you saying that the button isn't showing up on the page?

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Well, I tried your code on all browsers on a Windows PC, and it works. That is, the button and textbox both display fine.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The problem was that no button showed up. I honestly don't know what happened because the text box was fine so i didn't forget the <html> and <body> tags... I'm pretty sure that what did show up, was just the word submit after the text box, but no button. BTW I was using the code with W3schools' Try It Editor v1.4.

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This is the standard way to create a submit button:<input type="submit" value="Submit">It's been that way since the beginning of HTML. Here is the HTML spec that deals with the input element and the type attribute, you can clearly see that "submit" is a valid type, which creates a submit button:http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/interact/form...t-control-typesIf the button didn't show up, then either another element is hiding it or your browser is broken.

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  • 3 months later...

It took me awhile to realize that the forum appears to be the only way to provide feedback. A few words to that effect on the home page might save people some time.I'm very happy with W3Schools overall - so much content on so many related technologies in one place -- just what I was looking for.As I progressed through the XML technologies, though, I realized a difference in the tutorials: the Try it yourself links were missing. I don't use them all the time, but when I come up against a challenging example, I play with them to see how the changes apply. VERY useful.They disappeared when I got into XQuery and also now, in XSL-FO. Now, being able to think for myself, I realized there's probably a reason. My guess (being new to these items) is that there is probably some technology, or engine, involved that powers these other than a simple browser or server. Or maybe I'm wrong. Truly, I still don't know - though I'll be searching forums for my answer as soon as I'm done here.My point and suggestion here is that, while you are summarizing and teaching a topic, perhaps you could say a few words about how and in what context it is used as well. I realize you may not choose to endorse particular products -- although you had friendly words for XMLSpy in a few sections -- but at least a list or example of the environment in which it is used would help the process considerably.I read past the intro for XQuery, finding it interesting (I've done a fair bit of SQL), but wanting to try it and not being able. I'd read another section I wasn't quite sure about, wanting to try it before proceeding, thinking "...maybe in the next chapter." But as I write this I still have some confusion.Don't get me wrong, I've learned a number of languages over 23 years, and I'll figure it out. But compared to the comprehensive path offered in so many other topics, this omission leaves one wanting, and unable to apply (and therefore, perhaps to learn fully) the information that IS presented.Thanks in advance for considering to include this information where applicable.

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