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Scripting Vs Programming


webdesigner25
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These days, there is little difference between languages. Almost all of them can be compiled or interpreted. Each of the languages you mentioned is powerful in its own way.JavaScript is the only script anyone seriously uses in a browser context. You posted this question in a browser scripting forum, so if that was your intent, JavaScript is your answer.Actionscript means Flash. You can't use it anywhere else, so the question really has no meaning.VisualBasic is used in a lot of contexts, both compiled and interpreted.C++ and C# are almost always compiled and result in standalone applications. If they are compiled into CGI applications, the app will execute faster than a scripted app. OTOH, the big bottleneck in most CGI applications is transmission speed, so execution speed usually becomes unimportant. An exception might be a situation where you need to sift through 10,000 database records, or if you have to manipulate a hundred images before downloading them.All server-side scripting languages that I know of can access the underlying operating system as completely as any compiled language.---Usually someone asks this question for a reason. What do you really want to know.

Edited by Deirdre's Dad
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Scripting languages are interpreted, whereas programming languages are compiled... that, on the very least, used to be the definition. Nowadays, as Deirdre's Dad said, many languages can be used both by an interpreter or by a compiler.Nowdays, the disctinction between a scripting language and and a programming language is more about whether they have some kind of a direct access to the environment they are running on. Scripting languages, like JavaScript, can only access the APIs provided by the environment. You can't (for example) call an executable file from JavaScript, or access a function in an arbitrary DLL, you can't delete or save a file anywhere on the machine, etc.In programming languages, you don't have that limitation.Other than that, there are no differences between scripting and programming languages. That doesn't mean you shouldn't learn both. JavaScript runs on the client, so it can be very useful in providing instant feedback to the user, and reducing the load on the server. Languages like PHP have more uses, but lack the unique qualities of JavaScript.

Usually someone asks this question for a reason. What do you really want to know.
Most of the times when I'm asked this is as to whether "Should I waste my time learning a scripting language if a programming language has more use cases? Does it actually have more uses cases?"
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Nowdays, the disctinction between a scripting language and and a programming language is more about whether they have some kind of a direct access to the environment they are running on. Scripting languages, like JavaScript, can only access the APIs provided by the environment. You can't (for example) call an executable file from JavaScript, or access a function in an arbitrary DLL, you can't delete or save a file anywhere on the machine, etc.In programming languages, you don't have that limitation.
That clears it up...Thanks!
Most of the times when I'm asked this is as to whether "Should I waste my time learning a scripting language if a programming language has more use cases? Does it actually have more uses cases?"
So that would really depend on exactly what it is you're trying to do and how you want it done.
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Most of the times when I'm asked this is as to whether "Should I waste my time learning a scripting language if a programming language has more use cases? Does it actually have more uses cases?"
Learning any scripting language is never a waste of time, even if it doesn't help you immediately it will build your ideas and understanding of the literal scripting/programming context, how and why scripts were formed.
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