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c_me_7
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If its a project I am entitled to not tell you it can parse languages like css and html (hehe) making cross browser code easily. also you can use the javascript that you probably already know in it. Or you can parse vbscript thats what you know. I dont know to much but I know it can turn xml files into html and send the html to the browser instead of only having like fifty percent of web browsers failing parse your xslt. To bad I cant tell you this

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hi all microsoft products have a spiceal effict ,, but i think asp not a standalone langauge like php , when u work in asp u must use an other microsoft product and when u use asp 100% u must use vbscript ,, then thats depands on the other application u will use it in ut project . for example if use a sql server as a database its more compateble with asp , cause the same company create it , see the major of php sites use the MySql as a database . so all microsoft products easy to learning and more popular .i think this issues enough to use asp . :)

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Why should i use ASP?Why should I use it as oppose to other languages such as PHP or JSP?Regards

Generally, ASP is good because it makes the transition to .Net much easier. The future of web development is going to be .Net, and ASP is generally a move in the right direction if you want to transition to .Net.And in general, ASP is a more straightforward language. Its easy for humans to read, and it has a much cleaner syntax and it promotes good programming habits, at least much better than PHP. For instance, in ASP you should always use Option Explicit to force variable declaration (it also makes programs run faster), a feature lacking in PHP.In my experience, I found using regex is 1000x easier to do in ASP than in PHP. There is a single regex object, a Match and Matches collection, where all regular expressions are implemented in pretty much the same way, and they give the same output. PHP has 11 regular expression functions (ereg, ereg_replace, eregi, eregi_replace, mb_ereg, mb_ereg_replace, mb_eregi_replace, preg_match, preg_match_all, preg_replace), which are variably case sensitive or insensitive and variably return results as arrays or strings. Not fun at all. ASP.Net's regular expressions are even more powerful, especially with balanced groups and named captures (w00t!).Part of the reason why PHP has so many functions is its lack of function overloading. Rather than overload functions for case sensitive and insensitive, or better yet add an additional parameter to specify insensitivity, PHP just creates more functions. As a consequence, PHP has roughly 5000 built-in functions, compared to ASP which has around 200. PHP functions tend to have absurdly long names, averaging about 13 characters, compared to ASP whose functions tend to be around 7 characters. PHP keeps growing when they should really be focusing on creating a language that minimizes overhead, and reducing the overall number of functions to as few as needed to get the job done.Similarly, ASP's XML support is about 1000x easier to do. PHP has 31 functions for XML parsing, compared to ASP which has a single XMLDOM object and ServerHTTPXML object.A lot of people like PHP because its easy to use databases, but I didn't find that to be the case at all. There are 20 functions to connect to databases, which should be weighed against the "magic quotes" problems, and its tendency for global variables to open to script injection. ASP on the other hand other hand supports parameterized queries, rather than explicity stating SQL statements, so its much more secure and doesn't suffer from "magic quotes" when updating or adding new records.With ASP being replaced by ASP.Net, a huge problem is PHP's tendency to enforce spagetti code.I've never liked programming in PHP, its no fun at all. PHP is fine for small projects, or projects where there is relatively little intricacy. Small to medium-sized projects are ideal for ASP, and medium to industrial-sized projects are good for ASP.Net.Probably, the reason why people use PHP in first place, is that its weaknesses are made up for its price: completely free. ASP is a Windows technology, which some people consider is enough reason not to use it. Generally, however, PHP and ASP hosting is identical in terms of price and server quality.I use ASP because, above all else, I can make it do what I want much faster and much more easily.With JSP, its syntax is very similar to C#, but it just doesn't have a very large community. There are lots of PHP and ASP development communities, but not so many JSP communities. C# has really taken off, so if you'd like to use a C-like language, I recommend C#; however, you can use ASP to interpret JScript, which is to C# what ASP is to ASP.Net, although most ASP tutorials are written in VBScript rather than JScript.
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yeh but for my project i have to justify WHY i chose ASPand WHY i chose it as opose to other languages
How can we answer that? Why DID you chose it? You made a choice, why?
when u use asp 100% u must use vbscript
That's not true, you can also use JScript.
all microsoft products easy to learning and more popular .i think this issues enough to use asp .
That's not true either, there are more Apache servers on the web then there are Windows IIS servers. PHP is by far the most popular web scripting language. By a lot. Here is a report for April of market share in servers: http://www.securityspace.com/s_survey/data/200604/index.html Here's another version, in graph form: http://news.netcraft.com/archives/web_server_survey.html And here is a listing of the "most popular" languages: http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm which shows PHP (#4) ahead of C# (#7), VB.NET (#17), and VBScript (#41).
And in general, ASP is a more straightforward language. Its easy for humans to read, and it has a much cleaner syntax and it promotes good programming habits, at least much better than PHP.
I would disagree with that, I think it's the opposite. ASP.NET, for example has a function called FormsAuthentication.HashPasswordForStoringInConfigFile(), and the function runs either MD5 or SHA-1 over a string. So what if I'm not storing it in a config file? What if it's not a password? Will the function still work?? PHP has md5() and sha1(), which I think are easier to understand than ASP.NET syntax. That's just only one example, and it all comes down to programmer preference in the end.
PHP has roughly 5000 built-in functions
Why is that a bad thing?
PHP functions tend to have absurdly long names, averaging about 13 characters, compared to ASP whose functions tend to be around 7 characters.
Oh, come on now. Which 7 characters are you counting in "System.Web.Security.FormsAuthentication.HashPasswordForStoringInConfigFile"? Here is a reference of string functions in PHP, I don't think these names are very difficult (and you can see the average is less than 13): http://www.php.net/manual/en/ref.strings.php
PHP keeps growing when they should really be focusing on creating a language that minimizes overhead, and reducing the overall number of functions to as few as needed to get the job done.
Well, you don't use all 5,000 functions in every program. You only need to use what it takes to do the job.I also disagree with you about databases, I haven't had issues in a long time about any database. I keep my development machine configured the same way most online servers are set up, and I wrote my own small database helper functions, so I don't have any problems to worry about. I just make calls to db_query when I need to do something.Also, PHP definately does not enforce spaghetti code. Them's fightin' words! Spaghetti code is certainly possible in PHP if the guy writing it doesn't know what they are doing, but it's the same in any language. All of the automatic things that happen in ASP.NET means that tracking down one thing that happens can be very time-consuming, you don't know if it happens during prerender, or during load, or in the code-behind page, or onclick.. My own PHP applications are much easier for me to follow than most .NET applications I've seen.
I use ASP because, above all else, I can make it do what I want much faster and much more easily.
That's the exact same reason I use PHP. In the end, it comes down to programmer preference.
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Oh, come on now. Which 7 characters are you counting in "System.Web.Security.FormsAuthentication.HashPasswordForStoringInConfigFile"?
First of all he was talking about ASP when he mentioned 7 chars, not ASP.Net. And you are includeing the namespace decalrtions to exagrate your point.You would declar this at the top of the page
using System.Web.Security.FormsAuthentication;

Then use the function later on

HashPasswordForStoringInConfigFile();

ASP.Net does have some long names but that does make it very obvious as to what the function is used for as opposed to md5() (I hadn't heard of md% until a few weeeks ago and would not have understood what to use that for.I program in ASP.Net, ASP, and PHP and that is also the order of my preference, but I never use ASP anymore because I have no client demand for it. I use .Net at work, and occasionally get asked to do some PHP work.

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First of all he was talking about ASP when he mentioned 7 chars, not ASP.Net.
In that case, the issue is not ASP, but VBScript or JScript syntax. I hate everything about VB, and JScript is c-style, so I don't really have a problem with that.
ASP.Net does have some long names but that does make it very obvious as to what the function is used for as opposed to md5()
If the programmer knows what he is doing, and knows that he needs to hash a string, and the choices could be MD5, or SHA-1, or CRC32, then you make a choice on which one to use and look it up. The function HashPasswordForStoringInConfigFile might be a good name if you are hashing a password and storing it in a config file, but what if you just want to hash some arbitrary string, maybe file data to compare against, and store it in a database? Are you going to know to use the HashPasswordForStoringInConfigFile function? Where is the HashFileStringForCheckingMD5Signature function? You know what I'm getting at? The function doesn't hash a password, it runs the MD5 or SHA-1 algorithm over a string, but that's not what the name of the function says it does. Of course, all of this assumes that the programmer knows what he is doing. The languages that Microsoft comes out with seem to put an emphasis on how easy it is to use, as if someone with no programming background can go in and figure it out. Someone with no programming background should not be working on applications. If you're going to be designing or implementing software, you need to know the issues that you should be concerned with and how to deal with them, or at least know where to find that information.Also, you can't get any more obvious than md5(). The function md5 performs an md5 hash. That's why they called the function md5. It's not the language's fault if the programmer doesn't know what md5 is or what it's used for.Personally, I got started out of school doing ASP and Flash Actionscript, but once I found PHP I've never looked back. Requirements still demand that some things be done in ASP, but I always prefer PHP. I had a project where the client demanded ASP.NET, and all I really needed it for was to control a small content management system to handle the page content, but it took on the order of 3 or 4 months and much reading of books and tutorials before I finished that up. If I had been allowed to use PHP, it probably would have taken me all of 1 or 2 weeks, but that's only because I already have most of it built for everything else I do.
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A few things I will say about php that I really like is the easy functions for mysql. I like that all the database stuff is wrapped in easy functions ...I hated that about ASP.PHP doesn't seem to suffer from the unexplained Session timeouts like ASP and ASP.Net (although ASP.Net has Forms Authentication which is better than using Session in the first place)Also, I am not sure if it is a browser issue, but it only seems to happen when I use ASP, when a database driven page is updated it sometimes does not 'refresh' and the refresh button has to be manually pushed...I have never had that problem with ASP.Net or PHP.

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Also, I am not sure if it is a browser issue, but it only seems to happen when I use ASP, when a database driven page is updated it sometimes does not 'refresh' and the refresh button has to be manually pushed...I have never had that problem with ASP.Net or PHP.
I've seen that too with ASP, I'm not sure what's going on there. I get around it by using a meta tag to make sure the page never caches.
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