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People used less bandwidth in 1999 because broadband didn't exist or wasn't avaiable on such a large scale as it is today. There were no "YouTubes" because there was no infrastructure to support it.We should all go back to dail-up and shut down sites like YouTube and FaceBook? Are you serious?Because our roads are congested and in need of repair should we abandon our cars and go back to traveling by horse?

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People used less bandwidth in 1999 because broadband didn't exist or wasn't avaiable on such a large scale as it is today. There were no "YouTubes" because there was no infrastructure to support it.We should all go back to dail-up and shut down sites like YouTube and FaceBook? Are you serious?Because our roads are congested and in need of repair should we abandon our cars and go back to traveling by horse?
Well, obviously you can't move back.:)
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I think a world without long range cars will end up being sustainable by advances in broadband/highspeed internet.Wow, wouldn't it be nice if we could develop the internet to the extent that we could resort to the horse and buggy - I'd welcome it.

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I think a world without long range cars will end up being sustainable by advances in broadband/highspeed internet.Wow, wouldn't it be nice if we could develop the internet to the extent that we could resort to the horse and buggy - I'd welcome it.
How would that work? There will always be the need for travel. What about shipping products, etc?
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How would that work? There will always be the need for travel. What about shipping products, etc?
Shipping worked when they only had horses and carriages as well. And with the ultimate broadband, most information, documents, could just be sent between computers. Imagine the paper saved. :)Except that people read faster on paper than screen though...
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but what about when I order parts for my computer or ink for my printer or have to go 10Km to the grocery store? I wouldn't want to wait weeks instead of days for the horse to get here :)We will always need a means of travel unless somebody can perfect the transporter :)

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I was only half serious - there will always be need for transportation, without a doubt. The real question is how is it going to evolve and I just introduce one exterior influence - information technology. I see radar guided electric cars sooner than I see use reverting back to horse drawn carriage or even sky-cars.But what technology has done and will continue to impact more greatly is the amount of work related time spent traveling, even specifically in cars. I, for instance, could do 99% of my work from home, even today. The reason I can't is because various technologies needed to make that set up secure are just not cost efficient today. If I worked from home or even had a much shorter commute, I could live comfortably with only a NEV in my driveway (although I'd likely hold on to my Porsches for the fun). But driving, as a primary daily activity for non-professional drivers, is surely going to see a reduction in the decades to come as more and more tasks are or can be done passively - i.e. groceries can be bought online and delivered by PeaPod.com.Going even deeper, its interesting to conceptualize a time when only professional drivers would be able to even use the road ways - making transportation even safer for everyone if there is a whole process behind that (which would be online of course).:)[lol - wow, I can think up some pretty rediculous sutff]

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I was only half serious - there will always be need for transportation, without a doubt. The real question is how is it going to evolve and I just introduce one exterior influence - information technology. I see radar guided electric cars sooner than I see use reverting back to horse drawn carriage or even sky-cars.But what technology has done and will continue to impact more greatly is the amount of work related time spent traveling, even specifically in cars. I, for instance, could do 99% of my work from home, even today. The reason I can't is because various technologies needed to make that set up secure are just not cost efficient today. If I worked from home or even had a much shorter commute, I could live comfortably with only a NEV in my driveway (although I'd likely hold on to my Porsches for the fun). But driving, as a primary daily activity for non-professional drivers, is surely going to see a reduction in the decades to come as more and more tasks are or can be done passively - i.e. groceries can be bought online and delivered by PeaPod.com.Going even deeper, its interesting to conceptualize a time when only professional drivers would be able to even use the road ways - making transportation even safer for everyone if there is a whole process behind that (which would be online of course).:)[lol - wow, I can think up some pretty rediculous sutff]
:) You'll be able to go by road in 365 days time, after 100,000,000 processed through our Pentium 2 server. :)
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Do you all know about "Internet 2", a new network run by universities, in the US? You can send GB's in just minutes.
Internet2 is not a network, it is a consortium of 212 universities and 60 partner companies working on the next generation infrastructure, specifically fiber. The current speed record for their network (the Abilene network) is 9.08 gigabits per second over 30,000km for 5 hours.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet2http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abilene_Network
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Internet2 is not a network, it is a consortium of 212 universities and 60 partner companies working on the next generation infrastructure, specifically fiber. The current speed record for their network (the Abilene network) is 9.08 gigabits per second over 30,000km for 5 hours.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet2http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abilene_Network
Right..a lot of files. :) I read an article about that the other day relating to Internet 2, and someone was raising the issue of P2P.
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Why?
It's probably habbit. I mean, when you're little, you learn how to read (and write) on paper, not on a screen. True, the same rule doesn't apply for reading, I mean, many people, every coder (myself included), writes faster on a keyboard, but that's again because of habbit - we use it every day.Also, on screen, the eyes need to focus on a certain area of the screen and your head moves around. With paper, you move the paper around, not your head, which seems to be more efficient... errr... ok... I may be wrong, so I'll stop saying anything more, as this "efficient" thing started to sound like we're just software in an organic hardware (though I've heared such things before too, but this topic has gone offtopic enough already).
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